Blogs

New Biosketch Format Required for NIH Applications Submitted on or After May 25, 2015

23 January 2015 - 4:24pm -- Rolando Garcia-Milian

New Biosketch Format Required for NIH Applications Submitted on or After May 25, 2015

In a notice issued last December 5, 2014, the National Institute of Health (NIH) and the Agency for Healthcare Research announced the requirement of a new biosketch format for grant applications submitted for due dates on or after May 25, 2015.

The new format extends the page limit for the biosketch to five pages. It allows researchers to describe up to five of their most significant contributions to science. Each description can be supported by a list of up to four peer-reviewed publications or other research products, including A/V products, patents, databases, educational materials, instruments or equipment, models, protocols, etc. that are relevant to the described contribution.

Image courtesy of Dr. Trawick, National Library of Medicine, NIH

Although not required at this point, the NIH suggests the use of the Science Experts Network Curriculum Vitae (SciENcv), -a MyNCBI online tool- that serves as an interagency system designed to create biosketches for multiple federal agencies. This, along with the use of My Bibliography for grant activity reporting and NIH Public Access Policy compliance, increases the importance of using MyNCBI as a tool for managing NIH-sponsored research.

In response to this, the Cushing/Whitney Medical Library will offer the workshop “My Bibliography and SciENcv:  grant reporting, compliance and biosketch through MyNCBI” to introduce researchers, research assistants and administrators on the effective use of these online tools.

Apply for a Research Travel Grant!

20 January 2015 - 10:01am -- Andy Hickner

Ferenc Gyorgyey

The Historical Library of the Harvey Cushing/John Hay Whitney Medical Library at Yale University is pleased to announce its eighth annual Ferenc Gyorgyey Research Travel Award for use of the Historical Library.

The Medical Historical Library, located in New Haven, Connecticut, holds one of the country’s largest collections of rare medical books, journals, prints, photographs, and pamphlets. Special strengths are the works of Hippocrates, Galen, Vesalius, Boyle, Harvey, Culpeper, Priestley, and S. Weir Mitchell, and works on anesthesia, and smallpox inoculation and vaccination. The Library owns over fifty medieval and renaissance manuscripts, Arabic and Persian manuscripts, and over 300 medical incunabula.  The notable Clements C. Fry Collection of Prints and Drawings has over 2,500 fine prints, drawings, and posters from the 15th century to the present on medical subjects.  The library also holds a great collection of tobacco advertisements, patent medicine ephemera, and a large group of materials from Harvey Cushing, one of the founding fathers of neurosurgery.

The 2015-2016 travel grant is available to historians, medical practitioners, and other researchers who wish to use the collections of the Medical Historical Library:  http://historical.medicine.yale.edu/.  There is a single award of up to $1,500 for one week of research during the academic fiscal year July 1, 2015 - June 30, 2016.  Funds may be used for transportation, housing, food, and photographic reproductions. The award is limited to residents of the United States and Canada. Applicants should send a completed application form, curriculum vitae and a description of the project including the relevance of the collections of the Historical Library to the project, and two references attesting to the particular project. Preference will be given to applicants beyond commuting distance to the Historical Library. 

This award is for use of Medical Historical special collections and is not intended for primary use of special collections in other libraries at Yale.  Applications are due by Monday, MAY 4th, 2015.  They will be considered by a committee and the candidates will be informed by JUNE 8th, 2015. An application form can be found on our website: http://historical.medicine.yale.edu/us/grant

Applications and requests for further information should be sent to:

Melissa Grafe, Ph.D
John R. Bumstead Librarian for Medical History
Harvey Cushing/John Hay Whitney Medical Library
Yale University
P.O. Box 208014
New Haven, CT 06520-8014
Telephone: 203- 785-4354
Fax: 203-785-5636
E-mail: 

melissa.grafe@yale.edu

Additional information about the Library and its collections may be found at http://historical.medicine.yale.edu.

VisualDx: Not just for Dermatologists

10 January 2015 - 3:44pm -- Mark Gentry

                     

VisualDx is a diagnostic decision support system designed by clinicians to aid medical professionals in the diagnosis of visually identifiable diseases. It provides instant access to specialist knowledge at the point of care, merging medical images with concise clinical text. As the clinician enters actual patient findings, VisualDx creates a visual differential diagnosis. VisualDx contains over 30,000 images representing 1,3200+ visually identifiable diseases, drug reactions, and infections. Designed for day-to-day clinical diagnosis, emergency preparedness, and medical education, VisualDx is also Mobile - available for iPhone, iPad and Android Devices.

Access VisualDx online from the Yale or YNHH network OR  Get it on your mobile device

We Loan Technology

10 January 2015 - 3:27pm -- Mark Gentry

                 

The Medical Library lends a variety of computer and audiovisual technology.  Everything from chargers to camcorders to computers.  We've recently added to our offerings in several areas :

  • Camcorder ... Canon Vixia HFG220
  • Audio equipment ... Zoom digital recorder, shotgun microphone and boom mic stand
  • Computer peripherals ... External Superdrive for Macs, USB Webcam and a USB conferencing microphone

Only medical center students may borrow computers but all other equipment is available to any Yale student, faculty or staff member.

Visit the Equipment for Loan page for details

 

New Resources: Bates and Medlantis

9 January 2015 - 4:10pm -- Andy Hickner

The Medical Library has licensed 2 new resources that will be of interest to many users:

Bates Visual Guide to Physical Examination features over eight hours of anatomy and system-specific videos, each of which shows a step-by-step examination. Students and faculty appreciate the careful attention to clinical accuracy, as well as the range of patient types profiled in the series.

Medlantis provides hundreds of hours of video lectures, plus a wealth of content from Thieme eRadiology and Thieme RadCases: more than 43,000 ebook pages, almost 86,000 images, and over 2,200 case studies.  Users do not need to log in, just scroll down the page for direct access links.

In order to access either tool, make sure you are on the Yale network.  Contact us to learn more about, or to get help with, either tool.

Spring 2015 exhibits opening this month

8 January 2015 - 3:20pm -- Andy Hickner

Image from teratology exhibit

An image from the Teratology exhibit

There are 3 upcoming exhibits opening this month in the Rotunda, Hallway, and Foyer, in addition to Harry Potter!  Please join us for an exhibit tour for the Teratology and Prodigies exhibits on Wednesday, January 28th, at noon.  

"Teratology: The Science and History of Human Monstrosity," in the Rotunda of the Medical Library

Opening Jan. 22 at the Cushing/Whitney Medical Library
Dates: January 22nd-May 15th, 2015
Curated by Courtney Thompson, doctoral candidate in the History of Science and Medicine, and Melissa Grafe, Ph.D, John R. Bumstead Librarian for Medical History

From early modern marvels to sideshow performers, the abnormal body has provoked wonder and fascination, even as it has inspired the scientific study of monsters. This exhibit explores the history of the science of human monstrosity, from early modern accounts of human-animal hybrids and prodigies through to present-day explorations of birth defects. The exhibit traces the different approaches to human abnormalities/monstrosity since the fifteenth century, demonstrating the various ways in which monsters have been described, explained, classified, and displayed to an interested public.

An image from the "Prodigies and Marvels" exhibit

"Prodigies and Marvels" on view in the main Hallway of the Medical Library, curated by Susan Wheeler

Many of the individuals who evoked wonder were well known to contemporary audiences through the dissemination of inexpensive broadsides and prints. A selection from the Library’s extensive, and seldom seen, collection on this subject introduces a few of these individuals from the 16th through the early 19th centuries. The exhibit was prepared by Medical Library curator Susan Wheeler.

Please join us for an exhibit tour for the Teratology and Prodigies exhibits on Wednesday, January 28th, at noon. This exhibit will run through May 15, 2015.

"100 Years of Public Health at Yale" in the Foyer of the Medical Library, January 29th-May 15th, 2015
Curated by Toby Appel, Ph.D, and Melissa Grafe, Ph.D, John R. Bumstead Librarian for Medical History
The Yale School of Public Health celebrates its centennial throughout 2015. One of the oldest accredited schools of public health in this country, it today advances public health through research, education and practice in its home city of New Haven, across the United States and throughout the world.  This exhibit examines the rise of public health at Yale beginning with the appointment of C.E.A. Winslow in 1915 through the work of the School in the present day.

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