Off-Campus Access

Blogs

Report from the field: Leveraging Diversity in Grey Literature

6 February 2017 - 1:54pm by Kate Nyhan

Like other staff at the Cushing/Whitney Medical Library, I sometimes benefit from professional development support from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine. With their generous support, I participated in #GL18, Leveraging Diversity in Grey Literature, at the New York Academy of Medicine. Some key themes:

First, from the perspective of the researcher: keep an open mind about the types of documents that might be relevant, or even essential, to a research question. Perhaps you could mine the differences between transcripts and written testimony before Congressional committees, or maybe you’ll ingest community documents in every format to document bicycle policy. Thoughtful researchers are integrating new, non-traditional genres of evidence into their work. Medical librarians might not even be aware of the diverse types of grey literature that could be relevant to biomedical and public health questions – such as the governmental administrative materials that are generated by legislative, litigation, and regulatory processes; read “The Elephant in the Room”  by excellent speaker Taryn Rucinski of Pace University Law School for more details.

Second, from the perspective of the disseminator: you can facilitate discovery through a combination of pleasant user experience design and interoperable metadata. At the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, at WorldWideScience.org, at NDLTD, this dual path to discoverability appeared again and again. Without good UX and high-quality, machine-readable medatadata, dissemination with be a challenge no matter how great (and free) your material is.

Diversity was the stated theme of the conference, and to a degree the endless diversity of grey literature makes it hard to work with. How do I cite it? How do I evaluate it? How do I find it? It always depends. What GL18 has inspired me to do is to think more seriously, before starting to engage with grey literature on any topic, about what I expect I might find, how I can manage it, and how I will know when I’ve found what I need to. In this domain, I’ll admit that GL18 didn’t give me all the answers – but that’s ok, because now I know what the questions are.

Thanks again to the New York Academy of Medicine for hosting this event, and to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine for funding my participation, and to all the contributors who shared their work at GL18. 

Want more info on grey literature and public health? Start with this guide and contact Kate Nyhan, research and education librarian for public health.

Workshop: Increasing the Openness and Reproducibility of Your Research

3 February 2017 - 2:17pm by Andy Hickner

Increasing the Openness and Reproducibility of Your Research
Friday, March 3, 2017
9:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Yale Center for Research Computing Auditorium
(Registration required)

There are many actions researchers can take to increase the openness and reproducibility of their work. Please join us for a workshop from the Center for Open Science to learn easy, practical steps that increase research reproducibility. Participants will gain a foundation for incorporating reproducible, transparent practices into their current workflows. 

Using example studies, attendees will actively participate in creating a reproducible project from start to finish. Topics covered include: project documentation, version control, pre-analysis plans, and open source tools like the Open Science Framework that allow researchers to implement these concepts in a scientific workflow.

This workshop is aimed at researchers across disciplines who are engaged in quantitative research and does not require any specialized knowledge of programming. The workshop will be hands-on; attendees will need to bring their own laptops in order to fully participate. This workshop builds on the theme of the 2016 Yale Day of Data, which focused on data reproducibility.

The workshop will be given by Courtney Soderberg, the Statistical and Methodological Consultant at the Center for Open Science (COS), where she directs training programs for reproducible research methods. Soderberg received her Ph.D. in Experimental Social Psychology with a minor in Quantitative Psychology at UC Davis.

Space is limited, and coffee will be available. Please register here.

Calling all singers! Performance opportunity for a Medical Library event

24 January 2017 - 9:27am by Andy Hickner

Calling all singers! The Medical Library is seeking musicians to participate in a Musical Revue of works from our medically themed sheet music collection relating to WWI. Solo opportunities for all voice parts are available. Please contact Katie Hart if you are interested in participating: katherine.hart@yale.edu or 203-785-5352

New exhibition: "Refugees, Immigrants, and Library Books for Soldiers: A Selection of World War l Posters from the Collections"

18 January 2017 - 2:40pm by Andy Hickner

Curated by Susan Wheeler, this small exhibit reminds us of the impact of the war on non-combatants and the importance of attending to the emotional needs of soldiers.  The selections advertise relief organizations and services soliciting funds and materials.  World War l posters are well known for their beauty and effectiveness. These posters helped to raise over a hundred million dollars in relief funds and ten million library books.  This exhibition is on view in the hallway from January 25 to April 25.

New exhibition: "Yale Medicine Goes to War, 1917"

18 January 2017 - 2:39pm by Andy Hickner

When America entered the First World War in April 1917, Yale University, including the Medical School, leapt into action.  From mobilizing a "first of its kind" Mobile Hospital Unit, No. 39, to research on the effects of chemical warfare, this exhibition explores the many ways that Yale Medical School faculty, researchers, and students contributed to the war effort at home and abroad.  The war diaries of Harvey Cushing, a pioneering neurosurgeon and Sterling Professor of Neurology at the Yale School of Medicine (1932–1939), will also be on view, documenting the trials and trauma of war, particularly brain damage arising from shell fragments, shrapnel, and gunshot wounds.  This exhibition is curated by Yale doctoral student Maria Rios.  It will be on view January 25 - May 12 in the rotunda.

Qlucore Omics Explorer: A new tool for discovering and exploring omics data

11 January 2017 - 10:21am by Andy Hickner

(by Rolando Garcia Milian)

Qlucore Omics Explorer facilitates a dynamic, visualization-guided analysis of OMICs data, applicable to various phases of a discovery cycle. What differentiates Qlucore is the combination of speed, advanced analytics, seamless workflow, and simplicity. With Qlucore you can visualize, QC, apply statistics, and create publication-ready graphics, such as 3D Principal Component Analysis, heat maps, and various 2D plots.

For biological exploration, GO and enrichment analysis (perhaps the most user-friendly implementation of GSEA) are available. Use valuable public data (TCGA, GEO) to test your ideas, or generate/narrow new hypotheses, with an easy download and integration into your data analysis.  

This tool suite empowers researchers to participate in their data analysis,  exponentially shortening time to result and biological insight while improving accuracy of the findings.

We invite you to employ the  cutting edge high-throughput techniques without the learning curve associated with advanced statistics, scripting languages and painful integration of different tools and formats!

Supported data types include any matrix data including RNAseq, microarrays, proteomics, miRNA, methDNA, Mulitplex and FC (genomic data support is coming soon). Case studies are available.

Qlucore started as a collaborative research project at Lund University (Sweden) between the Departments of Mathematics and Clinical Genetics.

Register for a free account here.

Please contact Rolando Milian Rolando.milian@yale.edu for questions or comments on this tool. 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - blogs