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Musical Revue

2 March 2017 - 4:38pm by Katie Hart

Friday, April 7 at 12:00 pm, Historical Library
Cushing/Whitney Medical Library

Come to the Medical Historical Library for a live musical revue of selections from our exhibit “Yale Medicine Goes to War, 1917.” Bring your lunches and enjoy the medically themed ballads and marches inspired by the nation’s entrance into World War I. Songs will be performed by library and development staff members, and doctors from the Medical School. Join us!

 

 

69th Annual Lecture of the Associates of the Cushing/Whitney Medical Library

13 February 2017 - 2:58pm by Katie Hart

Please join us for the 69th Annual Lecture of the Associates of the Cushing/Whitney Medical Library.

March 29th, 2017 at 4:00pm
Reception to follow.

“HIV/AIDS from A(labama) to Z(ambia): Research and response since 1981”

Sten H. Vermund, M.D., Ph.D. 
Anna M.R. Lauder Professor of Public Health
Dean of Public Health
Professor of Pediatrics, Yale School of Medicine

 

Love Your Data Week -- celebrate with us!

8 February 2017 - 6:25pm by Kate Nyhan

Love Your Data week is coming! Libraries at Yale are celebrating this international event to help researchers take better care of their data. 

#LoveYourData events at Cushing/Whitney Medical Library

Data Horror Stories -- Brown Bag Lunch, 2/13/2017
Some cases are good examples; others are horrible warnings. Share your experience with data disasters over lunch on Monday. Click here for more details and registration (encouraged but not required).

Data Valentines -- 2/15/2017
On Tuesday you'll celebrated your loved ones; on Wednesday, you can celebrate your loved ones and zeroes! Create a Valentine to the dataset of your choice. Maybe you and your dataset have been growing together for many years, or maybe you're in the first flush of exploring your data's documentation and variables. If you love your data, tell us about it! Click here for more details and registration (encouraged but not required).

Cushing Center Tour: The Cushing Tumor Registry as a Live Dataset -- 2/17/2017
You may have seen the Cushing Center, with brains, photographs and more -- but have you heard the story of how the collection came to be, how some samples, photographs, and other metadata survived until the twenty-first century, and how researchers are still using these samples today? Join Cushing Center Coordinator Terry Dagradi and Research and Education Librarian Kate Nyhan to discuss the continuing life of this extraordinary collection -- and how lucky we are that the collection has survived intact for so long. Click here for more details and registration (encouraged but not required).

More #LoveYourData events at Yale

Check out more events celebrating Love Your Data week! From a workshop on data documentation to an emulation station where you can try out a live demo of '90s games, there's something for everyone. Follow along with #LYD17 and #loveyourdata on Twitter, too!

Want more information? Contact librarian Kate Nyhan, and check out Yale's guides to research data management and research data support.

Color Our Collections Week - 2017!

7 February 2017 - 11:27am by Kelly Perry

Just in case you missed our #ColorOurCollections week, fear not!  We've got you covered.

Following the lead of the New York Academy of Medicine (please visit their website, which includes not only the CWML, but several other examples of coloring pages by numerous other libraries, museums, and universities), we have rendered some of our digital images into coloring pages.

 

 

To see our examples from this year and last, please click on the following links:

The 2017 Cushing/Whitney Medical Library Coloring Book.

The 2016 Cushing/Whitney Medical Library Coloring Book.

 

Report from the field: Leveraging Diversity in Grey Literature

6 February 2017 - 1:54pm by Kate Nyhan

Like other staff at the Cushing/Whitney Medical Library, I sometimes benefit from professional development support from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine. With their generous support, I participated in #GL18, Leveraging Diversity in Grey Literature, at the New York Academy of Medicine. Some key themes:

First, from the perspective of the researcher: keep an open mind about the types of documents that might be relevant, or even essential, to a research question. Perhaps you could mine the differences between transcripts and written testimony before Congressional committees, or maybe you’ll ingest community documents in every format to document bicycle policy. Thoughtful researchers are integrating new, non-traditional genres of evidence into their work. Medical librarians might not even be aware of the diverse types of grey literature that could be relevant to biomedical and public health questions – such as the governmental administrative materials that are generated by legislative, litigation, and regulatory processes; read “The Elephant in the Room”  by excellent speaker Taryn Rucinski of Pace University Law School for more details.

Second, from the perspective of the disseminator: you can facilitate discovery through a combination of pleasant user experience design and interoperable metadata. At the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, at WorldWideScience.org, at NDLTD, this dual path to discoverability appeared again and again. Without good UX and high-quality, machine-readable medatadata, dissemination with be a challenge no matter how great (and free) your material is.

Diversity was the stated theme of the conference, and to a degree the endless diversity of grey literature makes it hard to work with. How do I cite it? How do I evaluate it? How do I find it? It always depends. What GL18 has inspired me to do is to think more seriously, before starting to engage with grey literature on any topic, about what I expect I might find, how I can manage it, and how I will know when I’ve found what I need to. In this domain, I’ll admit that GL18 didn’t give me all the answers – but that’s ok, because now I know what the questions are.

Thanks again to the New York Academy of Medicine for hosting this event, and to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine for funding my participation, and to all the contributors who shared their work at GL18. 

Want more info on grey literature and public health? Start with this guide and contact Kate Nyhan, research and education librarian for public health.

Workshop: Increasing the Openness and Reproducibility of Your Research

3 February 2017 - 2:17pm by Andy Hickner

Increasing the Openness and Reproducibility of Your Research
Friday, March 3, 2017
9:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Yale Center for Research Computing Auditorium
(Registration required)

There are many actions researchers can take to increase the openness and reproducibility of their work. Please join us for a workshop from the Center for Open Science to learn easy, practical steps that increase research reproducibility. Participants will gain a foundation for incorporating reproducible, transparent practices into their current workflows. 

Using example studies, attendees will actively participate in creating a reproducible project from start to finish. Topics covered include: project documentation, version control, pre-analysis plans, and open source tools like the Open Science Framework that allow researchers to implement these concepts in a scientific workflow.

This workshop is aimed at researchers across disciplines who are engaged in quantitative research and does not require any specialized knowledge of programming. The workshop will be hands-on; attendees will need to bring their own laptops in order to fully participate. This workshop builds on the theme of the 2016 Yale Day of Data, which focused on data reproducibility.

The workshop will be given by Courtney Soderberg, the Statistical and Methodological Consultant at the Center for Open Science (COS), where she directs training programs for reproducible research methods. Soderberg received her Ph.D. in Experimental Social Psychology with a minor in Quantitative Psychology at UC Davis.

Space is limited, and coffee will be available. Please register here.

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