Blogs

We Loan Technology

10 January 2015 - 3:27pm by Mark Gentry

                 

The Medical Library lends a variety of computer and audiovisual technology.  Everything from chargers to camcorders to computers.  We've recently added to our offerings in several areas :

  • Camcorder ... Canon Vixia HFG220
  • Audio equipment ... Zoom digital recorder, shotgun microphone and boom mic stand
  • Computer peripherals ... External Superdrive for Macs, USB Webcam and a USB conferencing microphone

Only medical center students may borrow computers but all other equipment is available to any Yale student, faculty or staff member.

Visit the Equipment for Loan page for details

 

New Resources: Bates and Medlantis

9 January 2015 - 4:10pm by Andy Hickner

The Medical Library has licensed 2 new resources that will be of interest to many users:

Bates Visual Guide to Physical Examination features over eight hours of anatomy and system-specific videos, each of which shows a step-by-step examination. Students and faculty appreciate the careful attention to clinical accuracy, as well as the range of patient types profiled in the series.

Medlantis provides hundreds of hours of video lectures, plus a wealth of content from Thieme eRadiology and Thieme RadCases: more than 43,000 ebook pages, almost 86,000 images, and over 2,200 case studies.  Users do not need to log in, just scroll down the page for direct access links.

In order to access either tool, make sure you are on the Yale network.  Contact us to learn more about, or to get help with, either tool.

Spring 2015 exhibits opening this month

8 January 2015 - 3:20pm by Andy Hickner

Image from teratology exhibit

An image from the Teratology exhibit

There are 3 upcoming exhibits opening this month in the Rotunda, Hallway, and Foyer, in addition to Harry Potter!  Please join us for an exhibit tour for the Teratology and Prodigies exhibits on Wednesday, January 28th, at noon.  

"Teratology: The Science and History of Human Monstrosity," in the Rotunda of the Medical Library

Opening Jan. 22 at the Cushing/Whitney Medical Library
Dates: January 22nd-May 15th, 2015
Curated by Courtney Thompson, doctoral candidate in the History of Science and Medicine, and Melissa Grafe, Ph.D, John R. Bumstead Librarian for Medical History

From early modern marvels to sideshow performers, the abnormal body has provoked wonder and fascination, even as it has inspired the scientific study of monsters. This exhibit explores the history of the science of human monstrosity, from early modern accounts of human-animal hybrids and prodigies through to present-day explorations of birth defects. The exhibit traces the different approaches to human abnormalities/monstrosity since the fifteenth century, demonstrating the various ways in which monsters have been described, explained, classified, and displayed to an interested public.

An image from the "Prodigies and Marvels" exhibit

"Prodigies and Marvels" on view in the main Hallway of the Medical Library, curated by Susan Wheeler

Many of the individuals who evoked wonder were well known to contemporary audiences through the dissemination of inexpensive broadsides and prints. A selection from the Library’s extensive, and seldom seen, collection on this subject introduces a few of these individuals from the 16th through the early 19th centuries. The exhibit was prepared by Medical Library curator Susan Wheeler.

Please join us for an exhibit tour for the Teratology and Prodigies exhibits on Wednesday, January 28th, at noon. This exhibit will run through May 15, 2015.

"100 Years of Public Health at Yale" in the Foyer of the Medical Library, January 29th-May 15th, 2015
Curated by Toby Appel, Ph.D, and Melissa Grafe, Ph.D, John R. Bumstead Librarian for Medical History
The Yale School of Public Health celebrates its centennial throughout 2015. One of the oldest accredited schools of public health in this country, it today advances public health through research, education and practice in its home city of New Haven, across the United States and throughout the world.  This exhibit examines the rise of public health at Yale beginning with the appointment of C.E.A. Winslow in 1915 through the work of the School in the present day.

Welcome to the library's new homepage!

3 January 2015 - 8:55pm by Andy Hickner

As you've likely noticed by now, the Medical Library's website has a slightly different look as of Saturday, January 3.  The main navigation menu now features dropdowns when you hover over links like "Find," "Services," and "About," and more noticeably, the homepage has a wholly new architecture and layout.  

We implemented this redesign in response to feedback from you about how we could make the homepage better. Click here and here to learn more about how and why the library undertook this project.

Here is a quick guide to where to find key items in the new interface:

Item New location
Ask a Librarian Menu bar, upper right
Email Staff Quick Links
Request Materials/Interlibrary Loan Dropdown menu > Services > Request Materials
Reserve Study Rooms Dropdown menu > Services 
Adopt a Rare Book Search "Adopt a Rare Book", 1st result
Privileges  Dropdown menus > About > Borrowing & Access Privileges
Policies  Search "Policies," 2nd result
Orbis Homepage > Popular Resources
PubMed@Yale Homepage > Popular Resources
Scopus Homepage > Highlighted Resources
Web of Science Homepage > Highlighted  Resources
E-Books & E-journals Homepage > Popular Resources
Classes Homepage, under slideshow
Tech Support (links to Printing, Remote Access, Desktop Computing, etc) Dropdown menu > Services > Computing & Technology Support
Remote Access Homepage, upper right (click on "You are on the Yale network" or "you are NOT on the Yale network")
Portals Dropdown menu
Department Liaisons Dropdown menu > Services 
Request forms Search "Request forms," 1st result

As always, please contact me with questions and concerns.  We are doing our best to make sure you don't get lost in the new interface, but if you do, remember you can ask a librarian for help.

New library homepage: What you need to know

19 December 2014 - 1:41pm by Andy Hickner

As I previously announced, the library's homepage is undergoing a redesign. Our user experience team completed user testing on the "hi-fi" version of the design today.  

Here is a quick guide to where to find key items in the new homepage design:

Item New location
Email Staff Quick Links
Request Materials/Interlibrary Loan Dropdown menu > Services > Request Materials
Reserve Study Rooms Dropdown menu > Services 
Adopt a Rare Book Search "Adopt a Rare Book", 1st result
Privileges  Dropdown menus > About > Borrowing & Access Privileges
Policies  Search "Policies," 2nd result
Orbis Homepage > Popular Resources
PubMed@Yale  Homepage > Popular Resources
Scopus Homepage > Highlighted Resources
Web of Science Homepage > Highlighted  Resources
E-Books & E-journals Homepage > Popular Resources
Classes Homepage, under slideshow
Tech Support (links to Printing, Remote Access, Desktop Computing, etc) Dropdown menu > Services > Computing & Technology Support
Remote Access Homepage, upper right (click on "You are on the Yale network" or "you are NOT on the Yale network")
Portals Dropdown menu
Department Liaisons Dropdown menu > Services 
Request forms Search "Request forms," 1st result

The new homepage is scheduled to go live on the evening of Saturday, January 3, a time of the week when website use is particularly low.  This will permit us to have the new homepage in place at the start of the winter semester.  

As always, please contact me with questions and concerns.  We are doing our best to make sure you don't get lost in the new interface, but if you do, remember you can ask a librarian for help.

Implementation of the Genomic Data Sharing Policy Begins January 25, 2015

9 December 2014 - 12:00pm by Rolando Garcia-Milian

Genomic data sharing repositories

The NIH Genomic Data Sharing Policy becomes effective with NIH grant applications submitted for the January 25, 2015, due date and thereafter. 

Investigators preparing grant applications for those due dates should prepare now if the work proposed involves the generation or use of large-scale genomic data (Suplemental Information to the NIH Genomic Data Sharing). 

Applicants preparing such grant applications are expected to:

  • state in the cover letter that the studies proposed will generate large-scale human and/or non-human genomic data
  • include a genomic data sharing plan in the application.
  • if sharing of human data is not possible, provide a justification explaining why they cannot share these data and provide an alternative data sharing plan.

Applicants who plan to use controlled-access human genomic data from NIH-designated data repositories as a secondary user to achieve the specific aims in the application should:

  • briefly address their plans for requesting access to the data
  • state their intention to abide by the NIH Genomic Data User Code of Conduct, in the Research Plan of the application.

Applicants preparing applications that involve research funded prior to the Policy's effective date should:

  • make every effort to include a genomic data sharing plan in the application that outlines plans to comply with the expectations outlined in the Policy
  • plan to transition to a consent for future research uses and broad sharing, if possible if the studies involve human participants and were initiated before the Policy's effective date and used consents that do not meet the expectations of the GDS Policy.

Additional questions:
Genomic Data Sharing Policy Team
NIH Office of Science Policy
Telephone: 301-496-9838
Email: GDS@nih.gov

 

Library homepage redesign: Your input is needed!

4 December 2014 - 2:39pm by Andy Hickner

Earlier this fall, we at the Medical Library decided it was time for a new look for the homepage of the library website.  We used an iterative design process to revamp the layout of the page.  A draft of the new homepage is now available for your viewing. We invite you to check out the design and "kick the tires," so to speak.  

Your feedback on the proposed design will be crucial in improving it and making sure it meets your needs.  Contact me with your thoughts and suggestions.  Be sure to note the browser and device you used to view the page - even better, attach a screenshot of how it looks on your device. 

We will be conducting user testing on the design the week of December 15.  After user testing, the page will undergo a final round of revision.  I will also provide an update on this blog summarizing key changes to the interface to help you better navigate the new look.

I look forward to hearing from you.

New Database Trials from Thieme and McGraw Hill

27 November 2014 - 12:32pm by Andy Hickner

Cushing/Whitney Medical Library is now running trials to three databases; details are below. Please let us know what you think by sending Nathan Rupp an email.

Medlantis-Thieme eRadiology

URL: http://www.medlantis.org

Trial expiration date: Dec 19, 2014

Description: https://www.thieme.de/en/thieme-connect/medlantis-5001.htm

Thieme eOtolaryngology

URL: http://eotolaryngology.thieme.com

Trial expiration date: December 19, 2014

Description: https://www.thieme.de/en/thieme-connect/eotolaryngology-52117.htm

McGraw Hill Access Medicine Neurology Collection

URL: http://neurology.mhmedical.com/

Trial expiration date: December 5, 2014

Description: See http://neurology.mhmedical.com/. Includes the following books:

Carney - Pediatric Practice Neurology
Kandel - Principles of Neural Science
Laoprasert - Atlas of Pediatric EEG
Lee - The NeuroICU Book
Martin - Practical Neuroophthalmology
Ropper/Samuels - Adams and Victor's Principles of Neurology
Sirven - Atlas of Video-EEG Monitoring
Waxman - Clinical Neuroanatomy, 27th edition
Souayah - McGraw-Hill Specialty Board Review Neurology
Biller - Demeyer's Technique of the Neurologic Examination
Watts - Movement Disorders, 3rd edition

Systematic Review Services at the Medical Library

19 November 2014 - 3:19pm by Andy Hickner

PRSIMA flow chart

Example flow chart used in systematic reviews, from Moher D, Liberati A, Tetzlaff J, Altman DG, The PRISMA Group (2009). Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses: The PRISMA Statement. PLoS Med 6(6): e1000097. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed1000097

Did you know our librarians are available to assist with systematic reviews?

The librarian, as full partner and co-author, is committed to collaborating and supporting the following Systematic Review tasks:

  • Determining if a systematic review has already been done on a topic.
  • Translating the research question into an appropriate search strategy.
  • Translating the search concepts into controlled vocabulary and keywords so that both precision and retrieval are maximized.
  • Choosing specific databases and other information sources to be searched.
  • Conducting the literature searches across all the information sources chosen.
  • Maintaining records of search results and following up with alerts and updates as needed
  • Helping to obtain all required articles cited in search results and other venues.
  • Providing guidance and support regarding bibliographic management tools, such as EndNote or RefWorks, to manage citations and easily produce bibliographies.
  • Writing the literature search methodology section for the submitted manuscript.

The Library adheres to the requirements for authorship and contributorship by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE).

For more information, contact your department liaison and consult our Guide to Systematic Reviews: Planning, Writing and Supporting.

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