Blogs

Over 2600 International Health and Safety posters at the Medical Historical Library

21 March 2013 - 10:30am by Melissa Grafe

In January 2013, the Medical Historical Library acquired a collection of over 2600 international public health and safety posters from 56 countries.  Topics include maternal and child health, anti-drug and tobacco campaigns, breastfeeding, clean water, prevention of diseases such as malaria and polio, and accident prevention and safety.  Kenya, The Netherlands, Oman, France, and Germany are particularly well represented in the collection.  Posters issued by the World Health Organization (WHO), the Pan American Health Organization, and Doctors without Borders are also included.  Please contact Melissa Grafe, melissa.grafe@yale.edu, for more information and for access to the posters.


We've Still Got A Job To Do!

14 March 2013 - 11:17am by Susan Wheeler

Howard Scott U.S.A. 1902-1983

We Still Have a Big Job to Do! 1943

U.S. Government Printing Office for the U.S. Navy, Industrial Incentive Division

Purchased through the John F. Fulton Fund 2012

During World War II, the Industrial Incentive Division of the U.S. Navy sought to improve morale among workers in U.S. industrial plants by emphasizing the importance of the plant’s products in the overall war effort. The morale initiative, begun in May of 1943, employed audio interviews and other messages piped in through speaker systems in the workplace;  exhibited combat action photographs, specially commissioned posters and combat motion pictures in the workplace; and arranged for returned combat personnel to visit the plants engaged in war production.

This recently acquired poster, created to boost the morale of defense industry workers during World War II, is on view through April 12, 2013

http://library.medicine.yale.edu/featured/war

Is your NIH funding in jeopardy?

13 March 2013 - 12:27pm by Lynn Sette

The latest news from NIH :

For non-competing continuation grant awards with a start date of July 1, 2013 or beyond:

  1. NIH will delay processing of an award if publications arising from it are not in compliance with the NIH Public Access Policy (stating that final peer-reviewed journal manuscripts must be submitted to the public digital archive PubMed Central)
  2. Investigators will need to use My NCBI’s My Bibliography to complete the publication section in progress reports.

The Library has created a guide and there are tutorials and training materials on the NIH website.

The Library is also poised and ready to support you in the compliance process.  Contact your librarian for personal assistance.  July 1st is only a few months away.

Together, We Remember

15 February 2013 - 2:36pm by Lynn Sette

Stop in the library to see Together, We Remember, an exhibit to commemorate Black History Month prepared by the Student Medical Association.  This special exhibit examines how slaves became health care workers, covering slave medicine to the established Contraband Hospital:

  1. Slave Medicine focuses on how slaves would tend to their own medical issues using many herbal remedies that have influences from many different parts of Africa.
  2. The transition to the Contraband Hospital and the creation of the first several houses where "contraband" (i.e. slaves that either escaped or were freed in the chaos of the war) were treated for medical issues. The focus is on the Elisha Miller house in Alexandria which was one of the first such medical places built by the union army to treat the "contraband".
  3. The Contraband Hospital and the people that had an important role in the hospital including the various African American surgeons that staffed the hospital.

Exhibit: War

28 January 2013 - 3:04pm by Susan Wheeler

On view in the Library Corridor

War

Selections from the Collection of Prints and Drawings and the Historical Medical Poster Collection

Eyewitness renderings of medicine in the field during World War I and World War II, together with posters from various wartime agencies, show part of the war experience and its effect on individuals.

 

"Nearly Well"- the story of Civil War soldier Robert Butcher

27 January 2013 - 10:04pm by Melissa Grafe

Robert A. Butcher, Co. H, 82nd Infantry, Pennsylvania
Robert A. Butcher was 21 when he enlisted in H Company 82nd Infantry Pennsylvania. Before the war, he was living with his mother, father, brother and sister in Philadelphia. His head was struck by a sabre on April 6th 1865 at Burkes’ Station, Virginia and he suffered two major cuts across the top of his head. He was admitted to Harewood Hospital on April 16th and, although the wounds healed rapidly, he began complaining of severe headache and intolerance to light. His anterior head wound re-opened a month later and began discharging unhealthy pus. After the wound opened, his headache gradually subsided and the wounds healed again. Physicians discharged him on June 9th and listed him as “nearly well.”

Robert moved through three different homes for disabled veterans over the course of the next sixty years until he died in 1933. The first was in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the second was in Grant, Indiana, and the third was in Chesapeake, Virginia. He varied from being listed as an inmate to being listed as a mental patient. He is buried in Hampton National Cemetery.

On view now, the Medical Historical Library explores Civil War medicine through the haunting photographs of wounded soldiers in an exhibit, "Portraits of Wounded Bodies: Photographs of Civil War Soldiers from Harewood Hospital, Washington, D.C., 1863-1866." Selections from a set of 93 photographic portraits, including Robert Butcher's, from Harewood Hospital, Washington D.C. are on display in the Rotunda of the Medical Library. In the foyer of Sterling Hall, the exhibit expands to include a larger discussion of Civil War medicine and surgery, including hospitals and nurses, using images and materials from the Medical Historical Library. On view until April 1st, 2013.  An online version of the Harewood Hospital photographs is available in the Digital Library.

Clinical Trial Information

9 January 2013 - 11:05am by Lynn Sette

ClinicalTrials.gov

ClinicalTrials.gov is a web-based resource that provides publicly and privately supported clinical studies of human participants on a wide range of diseases and conditions conducted around the world.  ClinicalTrials.gov currently lists over 138,000 studies with locations in all 50 states and in 182 countries.

What Information can I find?

Current and completed studies. Each disease or condition entry contains the title, design of the study, intervention, eligibility criteria, location and contact information. Also, some studies include results information.

Provide information to patients about clinical trials.

Find out how to register your study, submit and maintain study records, enter summary information, protocols and results.

What can I do on this site?

  • Find and view clinical trials
  • Learn more about clinical research
  • Manage study records
  • Learn how to read a study record
  • Download content for analysis

National Cancer Institute - Clinical Trials

Search the National Cancer Institute’s list of clinical trials, 8,000 currently recruiting and 19,000 closed trials, browse recent clinical trial results by type of cancer or topic, and find information for investigators and research teams about conducting clinical trials.  Also, includes finding and understanding cancer statistics and statistical tools and data for researchers.

Read NCI in the News, NCI Highlights or set-up a RSS feed to keep up-to-date.

Portraits of Wounded Bodies

7 January 2013 - 2:28pm by Melissa Grafe

Portraits of Wounded Bodies:  Photographs of Civil War Soldiers from Harewood Hospital, Washington, D.C., 1863-1866

January 16th-April 1st, 2013

Tours open to all on Wed. Jan. 23rd, 4 p.m., and Friday Jan. 25th at noon!

One hundred and fifty years ago, the Civil War raged throughout the United States, creating thousands of casualties.  On view now, the Medical Historical Library explores Civil War medicine through the haunting photographs of wounded soldiers.  Curated by Heidi Knoblauch, a doctoral student in Yale’s Section of the History of Medicine, and Melissa Grafe, John R. Bumstead Librarian for Medical History, selections from a set of 93 photographic portraits from Harewood Hospital, Washington D.C. are on display in the Rotunda of the Medical Library.  These images, some quite graphic, depict soldiers recovering from a variety of wounds, including gunshot wounds.  The soldiers’ case histories and stories, analyzed by Heidi Knoblauch, are part of a larger examination of medical photography and Civil War memory as America commemorates the 150th anniversary of the war.  In the foyer of Sterling Hall, the exhibit expands to include a larger discussion of Civil War medicine and surgery, including hospitals and nurses, using images and materials from the Medical Historical Library.  An online version of the Harewood Hospital photographs is available in the Digital Library of the Medical Historical Library.

This exhibit is on display at the Cushing/Whitney Medical Library, 333 Cedar Street. For more information, contact Melissa Grafe, Ph.D, John R. Bumstead Librarian for Medical History, at melissa.grafe@yale.edu.

Become a Friend of the Medical Library

28 November 2012 - 2:44pm by Lynn Sette

Library users know the value of the Library, its staff, and collections to assist their everyday needs.  Become a Medical Library Associate (in essence a friend of the Library) and take pride in knowing that you will help enrich and preserve collections, as well as create infrastructure to support the Library’s important role in the Yale Medical Center. Your commitment will help to ensure the continued excellence of the Library and its dedication to lifelong learning.

Help us to:

  • Enrich collections
  • Preserve treasures
  • Digitize rare books
  • Build collaborative spaces
  • Support teaching and research

Please visit the Associates web page and click on Get Involved or contact Katie Hart – katherine.hart@yale.edu 203-785-5352.

Subscribe to RSS - blogs