Blogs

Together, We Remember

15 February 2013 - 2:36pm by Lynn Sette

Stop in the library to see Together, We Remember, an exhibit to commemorate Black History Month prepared by the Student Medical Association.  This special exhibit examines how slaves became health care workers, covering slave medicine to the established Contraband Hospital:

  1. Slave Medicine focuses on how slaves would tend to their own medical issues using many herbal remedies that have influences from many different parts of Africa.
  2. The transition to the Contraband Hospital and the creation of the first several houses where "contraband" (i.e. slaves that either escaped or were freed in the chaos of the war) were treated for medical issues. The focus is on the Elisha Miller house in Alexandria which was one of the first such medical places built by the union army to treat the "contraband".
  3. The Contraband Hospital and the people that had an important role in the hospital including the various African American surgeons that staffed the hospital.

Exhibit: War

28 January 2013 - 3:04pm by Susan Wheeler

On view in the Library Corridor

War

Selections from the Collection of Prints and Drawings and the Historical Medical Poster Collection

Eyewitness renderings of medicine in the field during World War I and World War II, together with posters from various wartime agencies, show part of the war experience and its effect on individuals.

 

"Nearly Well"- the story of Civil War soldier Robert Butcher

27 January 2013 - 10:04pm by Melissa Grafe

Robert A. Butcher, Co. H, 82nd Infantry, Pennsylvania
Robert A. Butcher was 21 when he enlisted in H Company 82nd Infantry Pennsylvania. Before the war, he was living with his mother, father, brother and sister in Philadelphia. His head was struck by a sabre on April 6th 1865 at Burkes’ Station, Virginia and he suffered two major cuts across the top of his head. He was admitted to Harewood Hospital on April 16th and, although the wounds healed rapidly, he began complaining of severe headache and intolerance to light. His anterior head wound re-opened a month later and began discharging unhealthy pus. After the wound opened, his headache gradually subsided and the wounds healed again. Physicians discharged him on June 9th and listed him as “nearly well.”

Robert moved through three different homes for disabled veterans over the course of the next sixty years until he died in 1933. The first was in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the second was in Grant, Indiana, and the third was in Chesapeake, Virginia. He varied from being listed as an inmate to being listed as a mental patient. He is buried in Hampton National Cemetery.

On view now, the Medical Historical Library explores Civil War medicine through the haunting photographs of wounded soldiers in an exhibit, "Portraits of Wounded Bodies: Photographs of Civil War Soldiers from Harewood Hospital, Washington, D.C., 1863-1866." Selections from a set of 93 photographic portraits, including Robert Butcher's, from Harewood Hospital, Washington D.C. are on display in the Rotunda of the Medical Library. In the foyer of Sterling Hall, the exhibit expands to include a larger discussion of Civil War medicine and surgery, including hospitals and nurses, using images and materials from the Medical Historical Library. On view until April 1st, 2013.  An online version of the Harewood Hospital photographs is available in the Digital Library.

Clinical Trial Information

9 January 2013 - 11:05am by Lynn Sette

ClinicalTrials.gov

ClinicalTrials.gov is a web-based resource that provides publicly and privately supported clinical studies of human participants on a wide range of diseases and conditions conducted around the world.  ClinicalTrials.gov currently lists over 138,000 studies with locations in all 50 states and in 182 countries.

What Information can I find?

Current and completed studies. Each disease or condition entry contains the title, design of the study, intervention, eligibility criteria, location and contact information. Also, some studies include results information.

Provide information to patients about clinical trials.

Find out how to register your study, submit and maintain study records, enter summary information, protocols and results.

What can I do on this site?

  • Find and view clinical trials
  • Learn more about clinical research
  • Manage study records
  • Learn how to read a study record
  • Download content for analysis

National Cancer Institute - Clinical Trials

Search the National Cancer Institute’s list of clinical trials, 8,000 currently recruiting and 19,000 closed trials, browse recent clinical trial results by type of cancer or topic, and find information for investigators and research teams about conducting clinical trials.  Also, includes finding and understanding cancer statistics and statistical tools and data for researchers.

Read NCI in the News, NCI Highlights or set-up a RSS feed to keep up-to-date.

Portraits of Wounded Bodies

7 January 2013 - 2:28pm by Melissa Grafe

Portraits of Wounded Bodies:  Photographs of Civil War Soldiers from Harewood Hospital, Washington, D.C., 1863-1866

January 16th-April 1st, 2013

Tours open to all on Wed. Jan. 23rd, 4 p.m., and Friday Jan. 25th at noon!

One hundred and fifty years ago, the Civil War raged throughout the United States, creating thousands of casualties.  On view now, the Medical Historical Library explores Civil War medicine through the haunting photographs of wounded soldiers.  Curated by Heidi Knoblauch, a doctoral student in Yale’s Section of the History of Medicine, and Melissa Grafe, John R. Bumstead Librarian for Medical History, selections from a set of 93 photographic portraits from Harewood Hospital, Washington D.C. are on display in the Rotunda of the Medical Library.  These images, some quite graphic, depict soldiers recovering from a variety of wounds, including gunshot wounds.  The soldiers’ case histories and stories, analyzed by Heidi Knoblauch, are part of a larger examination of medical photography and Civil War memory as America commemorates the 150th anniversary of the war.  In the foyer of Sterling Hall, the exhibit expands to include a larger discussion of Civil War medicine and surgery, including hospitals and nurses, using images and materials from the Medical Historical Library.  An online version of the Harewood Hospital photographs is available in the Digital Library of the Medical Historical Library.

This exhibit is on display at the Cushing/Whitney Medical Library, 333 Cedar Street. For more information, contact Melissa Grafe, Ph.D, John R. Bumstead Librarian for Medical History, at melissa.grafe@yale.edu.

Become a Friend of the Medical Library

28 November 2012 - 2:44pm by Lynn Sette

Library users know the value of the Library, its staff, and collections to assist their everyday needs.  Become a Medical Library Associate (in essence a friend of the Library) and take pride in knowing that you will help enrich and preserve collections, as well as create infrastructure to support the Library’s important role in the Yale Medical Center. Your commitment will help to ensure the continued excellence of the Library and its dedication to lifelong learning.

Help us to:

  • Enrich collections
  • Preserve treasures
  • Digitize rare books
  • Build collaborative spaces
  • Support teaching and research

Please visit the Associates web page and click on Get Involved or contact Katie Hart – katherine.hart@yale.edu 203-785-5352.

Database Reloads and Updating

28 November 2012 - 2:06pm by Lynn Sette

Annually at this time of year, database producers including the National Library of Medicine update their databases with new subject headings.

What does this mean for you?

It means the database will not be updated until the reload is complete, also if you receive an alerting update for newly added citations, it will stop temporarily.

This maintenance usually takes only 1-2 weeks.  Call us if you have any questions 203-737-4065.

GIDEON

12 November 2012 - 2:58pm by Lynn Sette

A global infectious disease database designed to assist in diagnosing infectious diseases and staying current on the latest trends in epidemiology and treatment. Used for diagnosis and reference in the field of tropical and infectious diseases, epidemiology, microbiology and antimicrobial chemotherapy. GIDEON has 3 modules: Infectious Diseases, Microbiology, and Occupational Toxicology.

Examples of cases using GIDEON:

Sample search - All tick-borne, viral diseases of Kenya

Award winning film "Twero: The Road to Health" Showing on Nov. 5th

27 October 2012 - 6:32pm by Mark Gentry

Don't miss the chance to view this film by 2012 Yale School of Medicine graduate Michael Otremba, MD.  This documentary follows a Ugandan journalist who investigates how patients often must seek care outside of an underfunded and overburdened public system. Desperate for help, patients are turning to an unregulated private health sector, where services are accessible, but at a significant cost. When patients cannot pay
their medical bills, doctors are resorting to imprisoning them.  Dr. Otremba, currently a Postdoctoral Associate at the Yale School of Medicine,  received the "Innovative Learning through Electronic Theses & Dissertations" from the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations in August.  Most recently, he won best documentary feature at this years' NYLA International FIlm Festival.  You can read more about his work in the latest issue of Yale Medicine

The film will be shown on Monday, November 5 at 6:10pm in Room 129 at the Yale Law School.  A Q&A session with the director follows. This showing is sponsored by the Orville H. Schell, Jr. Center for International Human Rights.

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