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Medical Library Building Closure 11/25/20

19 November 2020 - 5:27pm by John Gallagher

**UPDATE: The medical library will reopen on January 11, 2021.** In response to public health conditions, Yale Library will close all library buildings and spaces to library users at the end of day Tuesday, November 24. The Medical Library’s 24/7 room will remain open to users authorized to be on the medical campus. We will monitor the public health situation closely. This decision was made to protect the health and safety of students, faculty, and staff and will enable us to reduce our onsite staff substantially, while still providing critical services. Collections Contactless pickup will be moved to outside the medical library entrance. Materials may be returned at any time through the book depository next to the library entrance. Additionally, we will continue to mail books to home addresses. Remote access to our vast electronic resources is available to the Yale and YNHH community regardless of your location. Faculty and students needing access to special collections materials should email historical.library@yale.edu. We will continue to process interlibrary loan and scanning requests for articles and chapters. Submit a request   Support & Resources Please email your librarian for support or to schedule a consultation by phone or Zoom.  For general questions, contact AskYaleMedicalLibrary@yale.edu. Visit this page for information about online classes, tutorials, and research guides.   We are committed to doing everything we can to support you remotely during this challenging time. Please reach out with your questions.  

New Online Exhibition on Medical Astrology

3 August 2021 - 10:24am by Melissa Grafe

When people think of astrology today, they may conjure images of online horoscopes and celebrities casting birth charts as part of popular culture. Astrology has a much longer lineage, particularly connected to medicine and science. Medical astrology was widely practiced in Europe between the fifteenth and seventeenth centuries. Part art, part science, it was integral to several fields of study, linking medicine to natural philosophy, mathematics, and astronomy, among others.  In spring 2021, art historian Laura Phillips, Ph.D., Graduate School Alumni Fellow and Postdoctoral Fellow at the Medical Historical Library, engaged in a deep review of the Library’s collections to surface the surprising amount of material connecting astrology to many aspects of early modern life.  Visually stunning, medical astrology images provided a way for people to see and remember how their bodies fit into the larger cosmos, helping to situate their health in relationship to the universe.    Dr. Phillips photographed, curated, and authored a new online exhibition exploring the visual history of medical astrology in early-modern Europe. Featuring nearly 200 images from the Medical Historical Library’s collection, the exhibition tells the story of a controversial yet popular healing practice that “represented the epitome of exact science” for its time.  The exhibition is a deep delve into early modern astrology, including videos describing the use of volvelles in Peter Apian’s Astronomicum Caesareum (1540), multiple versions of the “Zodiac Man,” and a thorough description of how astrology was woven into astronomy, health, popular culture, and medicine. We invite you to explore Medical Astrology: Science, Art, and Influence in early-modern Europe.    

Medical library resumes full operating hours Aug 1

1 August 2021 - 4:26pm by Dana Haugh

The medical library resumed full operating hours on Sunday, August 1, 2021. After a year of operating with reduced building hours, we are excited to welcome Yale and YNHH ID holders back to the library during the following hours of service: Monday - Thursday: 7:30am - Midnight Friday: 7:30am - 10:00pm Saturday: 10:00am - 10:00pm Sunday: 10:00am - Midnight For upcoming exceptions and holiday closings, see our Hours page.  Additionally, The Cushing Center reopened to Yale and YNHH ID holders on August 1. Though guided tours are not available yet, we welcome you to explore the space on your own. Please visit this page for visiting hours and other guidance. Per Yale policy (updated 7/30/21), all individuals, regardless of vaccination status, are required to wear masks indoors while on campus

Yale ITS maintenance to impact library resources

13 July 2021 - 3:31pm by Dana Haugh

Yale ITS will perform maintenance from approximately 8:00pm Saturday, July 17 – 5:00am Sunday, July 18th.  This will impact most university systems including websites, VPN, EZproxy, WiFi, email, and CAS authentication. Access to library websites and resources will be unavailable during this time. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact the Yale ITS Help Desk.

Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Belonging Resources

1 July 2021 - 2:11pm by Dana Haugh

Recently we launched a new webpage that brings together medical-focused resources relating to diversity, equity, and inclusion. The page is located under the "Collections" tab and includes topics such as Race and Racism in Health Care, Disability Studies at Yale, LGBTQI+ Health, and the Women's Leadership Resource Library. Many of these resources are curated by medical librarians in partnership with various departments in the Yale medical center.  Visit the page If you have questions or ideas for other topics, please reach out to dana.haugh@yale.edu.

Overlooked Images of Medicine with Bert Hansen

3 May 2021 - 4:44pm by Melissa Grafe

Explore The Bert Hansen Collection of Medicine and Public Health in Popular Graphic Art which includes over 1200 images and items produced between 1850 and 2010 with additional reference materials. The collection is a gift of historian Bert Hansen, Ph.D., whose goal was to document the visual record of medical practice and research and public health in America. This video was produced by the Consortium for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, of which Yale is a member. View the Bert Hansen Study Guide for additional information. Over a period of thirty years, Hansen selected materials produced for the general public (not medical or public health professionals) that use medical imagery as an accompaniment to news items, for advertisements, for political satire, or for decorative items that celebrate medical history. Items in the collection include magazines, prints, posters, film publicity materials, product brochures, and promotional materials.  Hansen also donated photocopied reference materials, such as newspapers, as part of this gift. The collection includes over 600 prints, including chromolithographs and wood engravings from 19th-century magazines like Harper’s Weekly, Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, Puck, Judge, and Scientific American on topics including Pasteur’s treatments for rabies, cholera, diphtheria, polio, tuberculosis, vaccinations, hospitals, mental asylums, unsafe foodstuffs, and public sanitation. There are numerous illustrations using medical imagery in political satire. All materials are available for use in the Historical Library reading room. Collection items are listed and described, using information from Bert Hansen’s database, in a finding aid available through Archives at Yale.

Introduction to LabArchives

28 April 2021 - 10:31am by Dana Haugh

LabArchives is a cloud-based Electronic Lab Notebook to enable researchers to store, organize, and publish their research data. Special features include iOS and Android Apps, classroom integration, and support for funding agencies' data management plan requirements. LabArchives is free to use for Yale community members who have an active Yale email address. Learn more about LabArchives at the introductory session below. May 5, 2021 at 1pm Introduction to using LabArchives for Research at Yale Key features of LabArchives include: Ability to upload and store files including text, tables, images, spreadsheets, and attachments in their original format. Ability to create standard ELN formats and templates for your research group. Compatibility across multiple platforms, including mobile devices. Maintain all revisions of ELN entries. Note: LabArchives can currently only store low-risk data. Learn more about low, moderate and high risk data guidelines from Yale’s Cyber Security Team There are several online resources to help you get started: Support through LabArchives includes quick start guides, webinars, and video tutorials: https://www.labarchives.com/support/ LabArchives offers personalized 30-minute training webinars at https://www.labarchives.com/webinars/

EndNote Desktop: Sharing libraries and collaborating on research papers

20 April 2021 - 1:39pm by Melissa Funaro

Ways to Share EndNote Desktop Library 1. EndNote X9 Group Sharing You can share your EndNote library (or groups) through EndNote Desktop Pros: Read/write access, easy Cons: The sharer can only share (sync) one library, the share-ee can have multiple libraries shared with them, make sure to finish syncing before closing the library, everyone needs to have an EndNote online account   2. Compress and send an EndNote library (or group) through email or Box Compress and send your library How to: File > Compressed Library (.enlx) Pros: PDFs can be included in the EndNote library Cons: X9.3 isn't backward compatible. If this happens send an RIS file but note, all Groups and Group Sets will be lost, changes made by one user won’t be reflected in other users’ files.   3. Send your EndNote library embedded within the Word Document you've been editing with EndNote. Your Word document contains a "Traveling Library" comprising all references cited using EndNote. This enables you to collaborate with your colleagues on the same document without having to have the same EndNote library. Pros: Easy Cons: No pdfs, metadata incomplete, required that everyone has EndNote Desktop   Ways to Collaborate on a Paper (Pros and Cons) 1. Microsoft Word or Google Docs One person makes the edits. One person has access to the EndNote library and has control over the master document.  All others collaborate on the manuscript, editing and marking where a reference goes (use author, year). The person with the master document uses the edited document to add the new references to EndNote and then references into the master document. Pros: less prone to error Cons: complicated   2. Google Docs Method There is no EndNote Cite While You Write tool available for Google Docs. Pros: Highly collaborative Cons: Complicated Directions: Highlight the references in EndNote Drag and drop the references into your Google Doc. This will create an unformatted citation, (it will have curly brackets { }). Alternatively, manually insert unformatted citations in the format {first authors surname, year #record number}. To see the record number, in EndNote, right click on the display fields shown in the middle panel and tick Record Number to add it to the display. When the manuscript is completed, download the Google Doc as a .docx file Open in Word Make sure you have a completed EndNote library from which the Word document will pull the references from. If you have people contributing from personal EndNote libraries, the library at the end needs to have all the references in it. If you don't have a copy, ask the person (people) to compress and email their citations. Turn on Instant Formatting. If the reference number don't match, Word will prompt you to clarify which reference you mean. Training and Support Cushing/Whitney Medical Library Classes Contact your librarian EndNote EndNote Video Tutorials  WebEx trainings EndNote Guide

Yale Library Self-Checkout now available!

15 April 2021 - 11:55am by Dana Haugh

Yale Library has a new app that allows you to checkout materials right from your mobile device! Simply download the app onto your Android or iOS device, sign in with your NetID and password, and start scanning. Download the app: Android  •  iOS The app is available for current Yale students, faculty and staff and can only be used while on campus. How it Works Download the free "Yale Library Self-Checkout" app from your app store. 1. Open the app and click "Start." 2. Sign in with your netID and password. 3. Click on the "plus" sign in the top left corner to check out materials. 4. Use your phone's camera to check out materials by holding it over the book barcode. 5. You will see a list of items that have been successfully checked to you. Click "Finish" to complete your transaction.   6. Once you click "Finish" you will see this confirmation and a note that your receipt will be emailed to you. Receipts come from "receipts@meescan.com" If you have any questions, please reach out to AskYaleMedicalLibrary@yale.edu.

Sage Business Cases - Resource Trial

1 April 2021 - 2:29pm by Lindsay Barnett

The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library has arranged for a free trial to Sage Business Cases!  The trial runs through April 30, 2021.   SAGE Business Cases provides faculty, students and researchers with unlimited access to more than 3,650 authoritative cases from over 100 countries.  These interdisciplinary cases represent subjects such as entrepreneurship, accounting, healthcare management, leadership, social enterprise, and more. Please click here for cases related to healthcare management.
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