Caitlin Meyer's blog

Resource Spotlight: Ingenuity Variant Analysis

13 August 2018 - 12:19pm by Caitlin Meyer

 

Welcome to Resource Spotlight! The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library provides access to an incredible array of databases, e-book collections, software and more. In this series of posts, we’ll be showcasing highlights from our collection.

In this edition of Resource Spotlight, we’ll be looking at Ingenuity Variant Analysis (IVA). IVA is a web-based tool that combines analytical tools and content from the Ingenuity Knowledge Base to help identify disease variants in human sequencing data. 

The product allows you to select multiple samples to analyze together. From there, you can design the forthcoming analysis and add any relevant biological terms to help narrow down the list of variants likely contributing to the disease or phenotype at hand. IVA supports a range of upload formats, including Variant Call Format (VCF), Genome Variation Format (GVF) and Complete Genomics files (Var, MasterVar, High confidence junction, etc.). 

After you have set up your data, IVA lets you interact with the data with a series of customizable filters. Some of the filter types include: biological context, genetic analysis, predicted deleterious, cancer driver, pharmacogenetics, and more. 

Keep an eye on the library’s class calendar for trainings on IVA and all bioinformatics-related software. In the meantime, Qiagen, the company that produces IVA, has produced webinars, tutorials, and guides to help you get started. 

Finally, please note that the library’s license to IVA is for academic and research use only.  Results may not be incorporated into a diagnostic product or service. 

Request an IVA account.

For questions on how to best use IVA, feel free to contact Rolando Garcia-Milian.

Resource Spotlight: BMJ Case Reports

28 June 2018 - 11:58am by Caitlin Meyer

Welcome to Resource Spotlight! The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library provides access to an incredible array of databases, e-book collections, software and more. In this series of posts, we’ll be showcasing highlights from our collection.

In this edition of Resource Spotlight, we’ll be looking at BMJ Case Reports. BMJ Case Reports is a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary collection of case articles and reports from around the world. This collection makes it easy for researchers and clinicians alike to find clinically important information on both common and rare conditions.

BMJ Case Reports has been running for 10 years, with thousands of case reports available immediately online and in full-text PDFs. Within the interface, you can: 

  • Browse case reports by most recent, type of case, or specialty
  • Filter the collection by patient age, ethnicity, sex and more
  • Subscribe to an RSS feed of case reports on a topic of your choice
  • Access synthesized information in the case summary field 
  • Opt into email alerts to follow if a case is cited

Not only can you read case reports with this resource, you can publish your own - for free! The Harvey Cushing/John Hay Whitney Medical Library has created an institutional membership with BMJ for the Case Reports so that researchers at the university and Yale-New Haven Hospital can submit new cases to the journal free of charge. Click here for the submission code.

With something to offer for all specialties, start exploring BMJ Case Reports today!

Finding Conference Proceedings

28 June 2018 - 10:24am by Caitlin Meyer

Despite the promise of tools like Quicksearch and the breadth of massive databases like Scopus, certain types of information simply cannot be found in one place. No need to fret, though! We've got you covered. This series of blog posts will serve as a home of recommended resources and searching tips for hard-to-find types of information. Have a suggestion for a subject? Shoot me an email

Conference proceedings – the collections of papers and/or abstracts that are presented at conferences – may be published in book format, as special issues of a journal, or as a serial.  Sometimes they are in the format of an abstract, sometimes in the form of a ‘conference paper’. A conference paper may morph into a journal article (usually with substantial additional material) but not always.

If a conference abstract is found, then further sleuthing is required to see if the organization supporting the conference published proceedings or stopped at abstracts only. You might do an author search in the following resources to see if the author followed up the conference abstract or paper with a full-length journal article: PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Embase, or Google Scholar. 

Last resort? Contact the author/researcher directly and ask!

Recommended Resources:

  • Conference Proceedings Citation Index (Web of Science)
    Click on ‘More settings’ to restrict your search to specific conference proceedings citation indices or search the entire Web of Science Core Collection.
  • Embase
    Limit to publication types: conference abstract, conference paper, or conference review.
  • HSRProj (Health Services Research Projects in Progress)
    Information about ongoing health services research and public health projects.
  •  InterDok 
    Since 1965, InterDok has amassed material from conferences, congresses, meetings, and symposia. Locate records by search author names and paper titles associated with a particular proceedings.
  • ProceedingsFirst (OCLC)
    This is an index of worldwide conference proceedings – every published congress, symposium, conference, exposition, workshop and meeting received by the British Library Document Supply Centre.
  • WorldCat 
    This ‘world catalog of publications’ is an excellent tool for finding conference proceedings. Search specific conference number and title (16th and “international AIDS conference”), limit by year(s): 1989 or 1990 or 1991

Tips & Tricks

  • Associations usually publish abstracts from their Annual Convention in the association journal in the same issue or special supplement every year.
  • Sometimes both the authors and the title will change when published as a full-length journal article. Make sure to search creatively and read carefully.
  • Society, organization, and association websites frequently have information about their publications, including proceedings and annual meeting abstracts.
  • Requesting conference proceedings through Interlibrary Loan may take longer than traditional requests. It may only ever be available as an abstract (see second bullet point).

Resource Spotlight: Scopus

19 April 2018 - 11:13am by Caitlin Meyer

 

Welcome to Resource Spotlight! The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library provides access to an incredible array of databases, e-book collections, software and more. In this series of posts, we’ll be showcasing highlights from our collection.

In this edition of Resource Spotlight, we’ll be looking at Scopus. Scopus is the single largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature. Unlike Medline resources like PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE, Scopus is also the home to non-journal literature, like conference abstracts and books. Indexing more than 22,000 journals, Scopus covers science, technology, medicine, social sciences, arts, and humanities - making it a great resource for interdisciplinary projects. 

Scopus’ user-friendly interface mimics Google search in its simplicity. No special syntax or subject headings are needed to conduct an initial search. Being an academic resource, though, Scopus offers many functionalities that Google does not: 

  • Author search and author profiles
  • Search by affiliation to gauge the output of a specific school or department
  • The ability to search for certain document types
  • Optional advanced search functionality that lets you search specific fields like chemical or biological entities, editors, funding information, conference information and more

Offering data at the article, journal, and author level, Scopus’ broad range of content coverage makes its research impact information robust as well. Users can easily disambiguate authors and navigate to author profile pages that list publications, frequent collaborators, h-index, citation counts, disciplines that the author publishes in, and more. As mentioned above, this level of granular information is also available at the article and journal level. 

Scopus is a great place to start your research, a necessary inclusion in most systematic reviews, and a massive time-saver in calculating h-indices. 

With something to offer for students, clinicians, researchers, administrative staff and more start exploring Scopus today!

For questions on how to best use Scopus, feel free to contact Research & Education Librarian Caitlin Meyer.

Finding Book Chapters

3 April 2018 - 4:38pm by Caitlin Meyer

Despite the promise of tools like Quicksearch and the breadth of massive databases like Scopus, certain types of information simply cannot be found in one place. No need to fret, though! We've got you covered. This new series of blog posts will serve as a home of recommended resources and searching tips for hard-to-find types of information. Have a suggestion for a subject? Shoot me an email

Despite being the primary site of scholarly conversation in the sciences, not all disciplines revolve around the journal literature. Often considered "book-based" disciplines include archeology, law, politics/international studies, psychology, philosophy, sociology, history, communications, and media studies. Book chapters are generally cited less than journal articles and there isn't as established of a culture of research impact measurement around book chapters as there is around journal articles. Book chapters are still valuable pieces of academic writing, however, as they provide a home to content that doesn't fit well into the article format. Finding book chapters using electronic resources can be a little bit tricky, as the tools are scattered, but read on for specific tips, tricks, and resources to try out. 

Recommended Resources

Tips & Tricks 

  • If searching for the title of a book chapter, mark it as a "Keyword" or "All Fields" search instead of "Title". If you mark it as "Title", you might miss out if we have the whole book your chapter is in but it isn't entirely indexed.

  • If you know the name of the book the chapter is in, try using Quicksearch to locate the book and navigate to the chapter that way. 

  • Tools like Scopus have robust author profile systems. Try to search for the author of the chapter, click on their name, then all of their publications (hopefully the chapter you seek) will populate. 

  • If the Yale libraries do not own the chapter, you can request a scan or delivery of the book through interlibrary loan

It's March Madness at Cushing/Whitney Medical Library!

16 March 2018 - 12:53pm by Caitlin Meyer

Join us March 21st and 22nd for March Madness at Cushing/Whitney Medical Library. 

We'll be offering special classes comparing popular library resources. What tool or database has what it takes to win it all? 

All classes are free and will be held in SHM L 103, also known as the TCC or computer classroom.

Schedule: 

Research Impact
Scopus vs Web of Science
Wednesday, March 21st at 1:00PM
Both Scopus and Web of Science offer access to huge amounts of literature, track citations, offer insights into research impact, and cover multiple disciplines. Which tool reigns supreme? Which one does what better?

Register here! 

Literature Searching
Ovid Medline vs PubMed
Wednesday, March 21st at 4:00 PM
Ovid MEDLINE and PubMed both search the MEDLINE journals - but which interface is better? Which database best suits your needs? Ovid’s search building feature and clean interface make it a strong candidate, but strong enough to beat out PubMed’s legacy and features like automatic term mapping? Join Alexandria Brackett for this showdown and decide for yourself!

Register here!

Point of Care Bedlam
UpToDate vs DynaMed Plus 
Thursday, March 22nd at 11:30 AM
During this game (class), we will compare the differences between these two point of care tools. We will assess the validity of the information, the currency of their resources, and the different perks of the two products, including calculators, guidelines, patient education information, and more. Come to this class to help you decide which tool is best for you and your patient care. Refereed by Alexandria Brackett. 

Register here!

Citation Management 
EndNote vs Zotero 
Both EndNote and Zotero help you manage your references and PDFs, make the creation of bibliographies a breeze, and integrate into paper-writing software such as Microsoft Word for easy citing while you're writing. Both are free. Which is right for you? Which does what better? Come decide for yourself with a showdown refereed by Caitlin Meyer. 

Register here!

 

Resource Spotlight: Incidence & Prevalence Database

14 March 2018 - 3:44pm by Caitlin Meyer

Welcome to Resource Spotlight! The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library provides access to an incredible array of databases, e-book collections, software and more. In this series of posts, we’ll be showcasing highlights from our collection.

In this edition of Resource Spotlight, we’ll be looking at the Incidence & Prevalence Database (IPD). Made available by Clarivate Analytics, IPD is a compendium of global epidemiological data from hundreds of sources. The collection of data is intended to provide a comprehensive overview of your research topic - whether that be incidence, prevalence, morbidity, mortality, trends, cost, risk-factors, or disease classifications. 

The sources integrated into IPD include government reports, medical journals, market investment reports, medical and scientific associations, national and international healthcare surveys, trade journals, database audits, and industry contacts. The website is updated monthly with new information and government statistics are typically updated annually. 

In addition to the data sets procured from sources mentioned above, IPD also features: 

  • Hundreds of “Article Reviews”, where expert analysts condense information into digestible pieces
  • “IPD Summaries”, tables of worldwide and regional incidence and prevalence data 
  • A self-produced “Global Incidence and Prevalence Report with Map”
  • Information on U.S. patient discharges

IPD offers some advanced searching functionality that allows users to search by countries or regions, by certain publication criteria (author, title, date), by ICD Code, or by their controlled vocabulary of keywords. 

The Incidence & Prevalence Database may be useful to those involved in clinical research, public health, market research, product development, business development, and more. 

Start exploring the Incidence & Prevalence Database today!

For questions on how to best use IDP, feel free to contact Public Health Librarian Kate Nyhan.

Resource Spotlight: CINAHL

19 February 2018 - 10:55am by Caitlin Meyer

 

Welcome to Resource Spotlight! The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library provides access to an incredible array of databases, e-book collections, software and more. In this series of posts, we’ll be showcasing highlights from our collection.

In this edition of Resource Spotlight, we’ll be looking at CINAHL - The Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature. CINAHL is not only the home of a lot of the nursing and allied health literature that isn’t indexed in MEDLINE (PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE), but also features books and select conference proceedings. 

The database features full-text articles from 1,300 journals in the field and citations from thousands more. The broad coverage is complemented by search tools geared specifically towards nursing and allied health inquiries. For the sake of brevity, we’ll only discuss two: Clinical Queries and Special Interest. CINAHL’s Clinical Queries tool on the advanced search page let you select what type of question you’re asking (therapy, prognosis, etiology, qualitative, etc.) and select how broad or specific answers you’d like to receive. This way, you don’t have to browse through unnecessary or off-topic results. The Special Interest lets you filter your results before you even search as well, but by topic. Some of the topics include Case Management, Evidence-Based Practice, Pain and Pain Management, and more. 

In addition to providing access to the nursing and allied health literature, CINAHL also contains content to improve patient care such as: 

  • Continuing education modules
  • Evidence-based care sheets ranging from treatment for breast cancer to “Music and Hospitalization” 
  • Educational materials for quick overviews of diseases and conditions

CINAHL is available to Yale affiliates through the VPN, YNHH affiliates through the proxy server, and everybody on the YaleSecure WiFi network.  

Start exploring CINAHL today!

For questions on how to best use CINAHL, feel free to contact the library. 

Resource Spotlight: Bates' Visual Guide to Physical Examination

19 January 2018 - 11:26am by Caitlin Meyer

 

Bates resource spotlight image

Welcome to Resource Spotlight! The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library provides access to an incredible array of databases, e-book collections, software and more. In this series of posts, we’ll be showcasing highlights from our collection.

In this edition of Resource Spotlight, we’ll be looking at Bates’ Visual Guide to Physical Examination. An online complement to the classic textbook, Bates’ Visual Guide to Physical Examination offers users head-to-toe and systems-based physical examination instructional videos.

The fifth edition of the Guide offers more than eight hours of high-quality video divided into 18 ‘chapters’. Each chapter is themed (e.g. “Head-to-Toe Assessment: Infant” “Cardiovascular System”, “Nervous System: Cranial Nerves & Motor System”) and the videos within each chapter range from bite-size, animated anatomy review to extended examination demonstrations. 

In addition to the general knowledge presented in the Guide, it also features a section of OSCE (Objective Structured Clinical Examinations) Clinical Skills Videos. These videos allow you to test your clinical reasoning skills by observing a clinical encounter and then being given an opportunity to develop an assessment or differential diagnosis, and provide a diagnostic workup. 

Bates’ Visual Guide to Physical Examination is available to Yale affiliates through the VPN, YNHH affiliates through the proxy server and everybody on the YaleSecure WiFi network.

Start exploring the Guide today. 

For questions on how to best use Bates’ Visual Guide to Physical Examination, feel free to contact us.

New Resource Alert: Try BMJ Learning free until Feb. 16th!

5 January 2018 - 3:36pm by Caitlin Meyer

The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library is always searching for the newest and most useful resources to license for our users. We're considering subscribing to BMJ Learning and would love your input -- sign up for an account today and let us know how you like it!

BMJ Learning offers evidence-based continuing medical education resources for everyone in the healthcare community from undergraduate medical students to attending physicians. The platform is composed of hundreds of peer-reviewed learning modules in text, video, and audio formats on topics ranging from foundational competencies to advanced surgical skills. 

Most modules take about an hour to complete, but you can work through them at your own pace in multiple sessions through your personalized homepage. After you successfully complete a module, you can print a certificate and the completion details populate in your BMJ Portfolio. 

Examples of modules you will encounter on the platform include: 

  • The “hospital presentation” series, which allows you to learn about a topic through a specific case scenario
  • The 10-minute “quick tips” series, brief modules on topics ranging from treating patients with excessive ear wax to head lice to how scarlet fever presents
  • The progressive “practical skills” series, with basic and advanced levels across most specialties
  • The “medical education” series, which offers modules on topics like dealing with conflict, communication skills, public speaking, writing a CV, and interviewing skills

To get started, head to BMJ Learning’s homepage and click register. To register, you’ll need to be connected to Yale Secure, the YNHH network, or the VPN. After you register, you’ll be able to access the platform from anywhere. 

The trial runs through February 16th.

Let us know how you like it!
Contact Andy Hickner with feedback. 

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