Caitlin Meyer's blog

Finding Clinical Practice Guidelines

11 September 2018 - 9:23am by Caitlin Meyer

Despite the promise of tools like Quicksearch and the breadth of massive databases like Scopus, certain types of information simply cannot be found in one place. No need to fret, though! We've got you covered. This series of blog posts will serve as a home of recommended resources and searching tips for hard-to-find types of information. Have a suggestion for a subject? Shoot me an email

Written by Alexandria Brackett & Melissa Funaro

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) defines clinical practice guidelines as "statements that include recommendations intended to optimize patient care that are informed by a systematic review of evidence and an assessment of the benefits and harms of alternative care options. Access to such concise, evidence-based information stands to improve patient outcomes while decreasing time spent researching. Currently, there isn't one place to find all guidelines but read on for several resources available to you at Yale that make guidelines available.

Recommended Resources

  • ClinicalKey
    Select "Guidelines" in the "Browse" menu. In the search box type known topic or guideline. Also, search for specialty guidelines using the "Filter By" option.
     
  • DynaMed Plus
    Search for your topic. If applicable, "Guidelines and Resources" will be listed in the left menu. Guidelines are pulled from national and international organizations.
     
  • UpToDate
    Search for your topic. If applicable, "Society Guideline Links" will be listed in the left menu. Guidelines are pulled from national and international organizations.
     
  • PubMed
    Search for your topic. On the left-hand side of the page, under "Article types", click "Customize" and select "Guideline" and "Practice Guideline" and click "Show". Now, choose "Guideline" and "Practice Guideline" to limit your search.

Tips & Tricks

  • Currency and accuracy
    There are a lot of guidelines out there. Make sure you are using the most current guideline and that the guideline you use is a systematic review of the evidence developed by a panel of experts.
     
  • Guidelines are not universally accepted
    Difference institutions use different guidelines. Make sure to use the guideline accepted at your institution..

For more information...

 

Fall Class Highlights

31 August 2018 - 3:26pm by Caitlin Meyer

Are you looking to brush up on your basic literature searching skills? Trying to use PubMed or EndNote and encountering difficulties? Need to set up SciENcv? Our fall workshop calendar has everything you may need and more for a productive fall term. Read on for details or head straight to the class calendar.

In addition to weekly PubMed and EndNote classes, here are some of the classes coming up this fall that any member of the Yale community is welcome to register for and attend: 

Basic Library Classes 

Free resources and support in support of research 
Second Tuesdays at noon

Have you ever wondered what services and resources the library provides to help you with your research? In just 20 minutes, you’ll learn about first-class bioinformatics software, specialized databases, support for grant compliance, systematic review searching, statistics consultants, and more!

Academic Job Search Series at Cushing/Whitney Medical Library
The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library is excited to participate in this year’s Academic Job Search Series in partnership with the Office of Career Strategy, the Center for Teaching & Learning, and the Graduate Writing Lab. 

Tools for Keeping Current & Staying Organized
October 4th

Expand your toolkit for keeping current with the literature in your field and staying organized during the job search process. This session will cover: setting email alerts in various databases, setting up EndNote as a personal database, and using Trello to track job applications throughout the process.

My Bibliography and SciENcv: grant reporting, compliance, and biosketch through MyNCBI
October 11th

Learn how to create a MyNCBI account and link it to eRA Commons, delegate your account, populate and manage My Bibliography, learn how to use SciENcv to create multiple biosketches, create an ORCID, and more!

Special Topic Classes

Excel 1 & Excel 2
September 18 & October 4

In part one, refresh your basic Excel skills and move onto some intermediate topics such as formatting spreadsheets, sorting, filters, text-to-columns, combing data, and trimming. In part two, learn advanced functionality such as IF, COUNTIF, VLOOKUP, pivot tables, and conditional formatting.

Creating Surveys with Qualtrics
September 20

Qualtrics is a web-based tool provided by Yale ITS to create surveys. This hands-on class will prepare you to create your own online survey using the Qualtrics user-friendly interface. By the end of the class you will be able to: create a survey with multiple question types, distribute the survey in various ways, and view/analyze results. 

New to the Collection: Check out new resources available from CWML

31 August 2018 - 2:54pm by Caitlin Meyer

The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library is constantly on the hunt for the latest and greatest resources to make available to our users. In addition to the typical  journals and books you would expect to see as part of a library’s collection, we also work to bring you tools, software, and learning modules. This semiannualseries of blog posts will highlight recent additions to the CWML collection. 

Today, we’ll briefly talk about five resources now available to you: 

Read by QxMD

A user-friendly app for your phone or tablet, Read by QxMD allows you to keep up with new medical and scientific research on topics of your choosing. Curate your individual home page with topics, authors, and journals of interest to you and seamlessly access full-text PDFs. 

Ingenuity Variant Analysis

Ingenuity Variant Analysis is the latest addition to our growing suite of bioinformatics tools. IVA is a web-based tool that combines analytical functions and content from the Ingenuity Knowledge Base to help you identify disease variants in human sequencing data. Read more about IVA in our recent Resource Spotlight feature.  Please use this form to request a free account.

VisualDx

It’s back and better than ever! VisualDx, available as an app or on the web, helps clinicians in medical decision-making by providing evidence-based information at the point of care. The tool allows users to build and visualize differentials and contains the world’s largest medical image library. 

Aquifer Addiction

Available to students and faculty, Aquifer Addiction offers online learning modules to help students identify, intervene, and address substance use disorders. It features twelve modules featuring case studies, interactive activities, and additional resources with self-assessment questions at the end for learners to gauge their progress. Contact Lindsay Barnett to set up an account. 

Child Sex Trafficking Learning Module - Child Abuse Atlas 

This new module in the Child Abuse Atlas supplements the resource’s existing pool of examination techniques, teaching materials, evidence-based research and literature reviews, and case studies to help health care providers in recognizing the physical signs of child abuse.

 

Know of a resource we’re missing? Contact Lindsay Barnett with your ideas. 

Resource Spotlight: Ingenuity Variant Analysis

13 August 2018 - 12:19pm by Caitlin Meyer

 

Welcome to Resource Spotlight! The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library provides access to an incredible array of databases, e-book collections, software and more. In this series of posts, we’ll be showcasing highlights from our collection.

In this edition of Resource Spotlight, we’ll be looking at Ingenuity Variant Analysis (IVA). IVA is a web-based tool that combines analytical tools and content from the Ingenuity Knowledge Base to help identify disease variants in human sequencing data. 

The product allows you to select multiple samples to analyze together. From there, you can design the forthcoming analysis and add any relevant biological terms to help narrow down the list of variants likely contributing to the disease or phenotype at hand. IVA supports a range of upload formats, including Variant Call Format (VCF), Genome Variation Format (GVF) and Complete Genomics files (Var, MasterVar, High confidence junction, etc.). 

After you have set up your data, IVA lets you interact with the data with a series of customizable filters. Some of the filter types include: biological context, genetic analysis, predicted deleterious, cancer driver, pharmacogenetics, and more. 

Keep an eye on the library’s class calendar for trainings on IVA and all bioinformatics-related software. In the meantime, Qiagen, the company that produces IVA, has produced webinars, tutorials, and guides to help you get started. 

Finally, please note that the library’s license to IVA is for academic and research use only.  Results may not be incorporated into a diagnostic product or service. 

Request an IVA account.

For questions on how to best use IVA, feel free to contact Rolando Garcia-Milian.

Resource Spotlight: BMJ Case Reports

28 June 2018 - 11:58am by Caitlin Meyer

Welcome to Resource Spotlight! The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library provides access to an incredible array of databases, e-book collections, software and more. In this series of posts, we’ll be showcasing highlights from our collection.

In this edition of Resource Spotlight, we’ll be looking at BMJ Case Reports. BMJ Case Reports is a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary collection of case articles and reports from around the world. This collection makes it easy for researchers and clinicians alike to find clinically important information on both common and rare conditions.

BMJ Case Reports has been running for 10 years, with thousands of case reports available immediately online and in full-text PDFs. Within the interface, you can: 

  • Browse case reports by most recent, type of case, or specialty
  • Filter the collection by patient age, ethnicity, sex and more
  • Subscribe to an RSS feed of case reports on a topic of your choice
  • Access synthesized information in the case summary field 
  • Opt into email alerts to follow if a case is cited

Not only can you read case reports with this resource, you can publish your own - for free! The Harvey Cushing/John Hay Whitney Medical Library has created an institutional membership with BMJ for the Case Reports so that researchers at the university and Yale-New Haven Hospital can submit new cases to the journal free of charge. Click here for the submission code.

With something to offer for all specialties, start exploring BMJ Case Reports today!

Finding Conference Proceedings

28 June 2018 - 10:24am by Caitlin Meyer

Despite the promise of tools like Quicksearch and the breadth of massive databases like Scopus, certain types of information simply cannot be found in one place. No need to fret, though! We've got you covered. This series of blog posts will serve as a home of recommended resources and searching tips for hard-to-find types of information. Have a suggestion for a subject? Shoot me an email

Conference proceedings – the collections of papers and/or abstracts that are presented at conferences – may be published in book format, as special issues of a journal, or as a serial.  Sometimes they are in the format of an abstract, sometimes in the form of a ‘conference paper’. A conference paper may morph into a journal article (usually with substantial additional material) but not always.

If a conference abstract is found, then further sleuthing is required to see if the organization supporting the conference published proceedings or stopped at abstracts only. You might do an author search in the following resources to see if the author followed up the conference abstract or paper with a full-length journal article: PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Embase, or Google Scholar. 

Last resort? Contact the author/researcher directly and ask!

Recommended Resources

  • Conference Proceedings Citation Index (Web of Science)
    Click on ‘More settings’ to restrict your search to specific conference proceedings citation indices or search the entire Web of Science Core Collection.
  • Embase
    Limit to publication types: conference abstract, conference paper, or conference review.
  • HSRProj (Health Services Research Projects in Progress)
    Information about ongoing health services research and public health projects.
  •  InterDok 
    Since 1965, InterDok has amassed material from conferences, congresses, meetings, and symposia. Locate records by search author names and paper titles associated with a particular proceedings.
  • ProceedingsFirst (OCLC)
    This is an index of worldwide conference proceedings – every published congress, symposium, conference, exposition, workshop and meeting received by the British Library Document Supply Centre.
  • WorldCat 
    This ‘world catalog of publications’ is an excellent tool for finding conference proceedings. Search specific conference number and title (16th and “international AIDS conference”), limit by year(s): 1989 or 1990 or 1991

Tips & Tricks

  • Associations usually publish abstracts from their Annual Convention in the association journal in the same issue or special supplement every year.
  • Sometimes both the authors and the title will change when published as a full-length journal article. Make sure to search creatively and read carefully.
  • Society, organization, and association websites frequently have information about their publications, including proceedings and annual meeting abstracts.
  • Requesting conference proceedings through Interlibrary Loan may take longer than traditional requests. It may only ever be available as an abstract (see second bullet point).

Resource Spotlight: Scopus

19 April 2018 - 11:13am by Caitlin Meyer

 

Welcome to Resource Spotlight! The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library provides access to an incredible array of databases, e-book collections, software and more. In this series of posts, we’ll be showcasing highlights from our collection.

In this edition of Resource Spotlight, we’ll be looking at Scopus. Scopus is the single largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature. Unlike Medline resources like PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE, Scopus is also the home to non-journal literature, like conference abstracts and books. Indexing more than 22,000 journals, Scopus covers science, technology, medicine, social sciences, arts, and humanities - making it a great resource for interdisciplinary projects. 

Scopus’ user-friendly interface mimics Google search in its simplicity. No special syntax or subject headings are needed to conduct an initial search. Being an academic resource, though, Scopus offers many functionalities that Google does not: 

  • Author search and author profiles
  • Search by affiliation to gauge the output of a specific school or department
  • The ability to search for certain document types
  • Optional advanced search functionality that lets you search specific fields like chemical or biological entities, editors, funding information, conference information and more

Offering data at the article, journal, and author level, Scopus’ broad range of content coverage makes its research impact information robust as well. Users can easily disambiguate authors and navigate to author profile pages that list publications, frequent collaborators, h-index, citation counts, disciplines that the author publishes in, and more. As mentioned above, this level of granular information is also available at the article and journal level. 

Scopus is a great place to start your research, a necessary inclusion in most systematic reviews, and a massive time-saver in calculating h-indices. 

With something to offer for students, clinicians, researchers, administrative staff and more start exploring Scopus today!

For questions on how to best use Scopus, feel free to contact Research & Education Librarian Caitlin Meyer.

Finding Book Chapters

3 April 2018 - 4:38pm by Caitlin Meyer

Despite the promise of tools like Quicksearch and the breadth of massive databases like Scopus, certain types of information simply cannot be found in one place. No need to fret, though! We've got you covered. This new series of blog posts will serve as a home of recommended resources and searching tips for hard-to-find types of information. Have a suggestion for a subject? Shoot me an email

Despite being the primary site of scholarly conversation in the sciences, not all disciplines revolve around the journal literature. Often considered "book-based" disciplines include archeology, law, politics/international studies, psychology, philosophy, sociology, history, communications, and media studies. Book chapters are generally cited less than journal articles and there isn't as established of a culture of research impact measurement around book chapters as there is around journal articles. Book chapters are still valuable pieces of academic writing, however, as they provide a home to content that doesn't fit well into the article format. Finding book chapters using electronic resources can be a little bit tricky, as the tools are scattered, but read on for specific tips, tricks, and resources to try out. 

Recommended Resources

Tips & Tricks 

  • If searching for the title of a book chapter, mark it as a "Keyword" or "All Fields" search instead of "Title". If you mark it as "Title", you might miss out if we have the whole book your chapter is in but it isn't entirely indexed.

  • If you know the name of the book the chapter is in, try using Quicksearch to locate the book and navigate to the chapter that way. 

  • Tools like Scopus have robust author profile systems. Try to search for the author of the chapter, click on their name, then all of their publications (hopefully the chapter you seek) will populate. 

  • If the Yale libraries do not own the chapter, you can request a scan or delivery of the book through interlibrary loan

It's March Madness at Cushing/Whitney Medical Library!

16 March 2018 - 12:53pm by Caitlin Meyer

Join us March 21st and 22nd for March Madness at Cushing/Whitney Medical Library. 

We'll be offering special classes comparing popular library resources. What tool or database has what it takes to win it all? 

All classes are free and will be held in SHM L 103, also known as the TCC or computer classroom.

Schedule: 

Research Impact
Scopus vs Web of Science
Wednesday, March 21st at 1:00PM
Both Scopus and Web of Science offer access to huge amounts of literature, track citations, offer insights into research impact, and cover multiple disciplines. Which tool reigns supreme? Which one does what better?

Register here! 

Literature Searching
Ovid Medline vs PubMed
Wednesday, March 21st at 4:00 PM
Ovid MEDLINE and PubMed both search the MEDLINE journals - but which interface is better? Which database best suits your needs? Ovid’s search building feature and clean interface make it a strong candidate, but strong enough to beat out PubMed’s legacy and features like automatic term mapping? Join Alexandria Brackett for this showdown and decide for yourself!

Register here!

Point of Care Bedlam
UpToDate vs DynaMed Plus 
Thursday, March 22nd at 11:30 AM
During this game (class), we will compare the differences between these two point of care tools. We will assess the validity of the information, the currency of their resources, and the different perks of the two products, including calculators, guidelines, patient education information, and more. Come to this class to help you decide which tool is best for you and your patient care. Refereed by Alexandria Brackett. 

Register here!

Citation Management 
EndNote vs Zotero 
Both EndNote and Zotero help you manage your references and PDFs, make the creation of bibliographies a breeze, and integrate into paper-writing software such as Microsoft Word for easy citing while you're writing. Both are free. Which is right for you? Which does what better? Come decide for yourself with a showdown refereed by Caitlin Meyer. 

Register here!

 

Resource Spotlight: Incidence & Prevalence Database

14 March 2018 - 3:44pm by Caitlin Meyer

Welcome to Resource Spotlight! The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library provides access to an incredible array of databases, e-book collections, software and more. In this series of posts, we’ll be showcasing highlights from our collection.

In this edition of Resource Spotlight, we’ll be looking at the Incidence & Prevalence Database (IPD). Made available by Clarivate Analytics, IPD is a compendium of global epidemiological data from hundreds of sources. The collection of data is intended to provide a comprehensive overview of your research topic - whether that be incidence, prevalence, morbidity, mortality, trends, cost, risk-factors, or disease classifications. 

The sources integrated into IPD include government reports, medical journals, market investment reports, medical and scientific associations, national and international healthcare surveys, trade journals, database audits, and industry contacts. The website is updated monthly with new information and government statistics are typically updated annually. 

In addition to the data sets procured from sources mentioned above, IPD also features: 

  • Hundreds of “Article Reviews”, where expert analysts condense information into digestible pieces
  • “IPD Summaries”, tables of worldwide and regional incidence and prevalence data 
  • A self-produced “Global Incidence and Prevalence Report with Map”
  • Information on U.S. patient discharges

IPD offers some advanced searching functionality that allows users to search by countries or regions, by certain publication criteria (author, title, date), by ICD Code, or by their controlled vocabulary of keywords. 

The Incidence & Prevalence Database may be useful to those involved in clinical research, public health, market research, product development, business development, and more. 

Start exploring the Incidence & Prevalence Database today!

For questions on how to best use IDP, feel free to contact Public Health Librarian Kate Nyhan.

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