Home Blogs Lindsay Barnett's blog

Lindsay Barnett's blog

Open Access Week 2021

October 25, 2021 - 1:10pm by Lindsay Barnett

Welcome to Open Access Week 2021!  Visit this page for daily updates with short activities you can complete to learn more about open access publishing and show you support for greater transparency in the scholarly publishing industry.  From SPARC, “Open Access is the free, immediate, online availability of research articles coupled with the rights to use these articles fully in the digital environment.”  Open access allows researchers around the world to access scholarship with no waiting periods or embargos, allowing research results to be disseminated and built upon more quickly.  Did you know that the Yale Library supports open access publishing?  We fund a number of membership programs that reduce or eliminate article processing charges (APCs) associated with open access articles for Yale authors.  Our membership with PLOS waives all APCs in all PLOS journals for any article with a Yale corresponding author.  Find more information about library support for open access here.  Take our Open Access Week 2021 Quiz for an opportunity to win a prize up to $25 in value from the Yale bookstore!

Sage Business Cases - Resource Trial

April 1, 2021 - 2:29pm by Lindsay Barnett

The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library has arranged for a free trial to Sage Business Cases!  The trial runs through April 30, 2021.   SAGE Business Cases provides faculty, students and researchers with unlimited access to more than 3,650 authoritative cases from over 100 countries.  These interdisciplinary cases represent subjects such as entrepreneurship, accounting, healthcare management, leadership, social enterprise, and more. Please click here for cases related to healthcare management.

Library to Cover All Publishing Fees for PLOS Journals

February 24, 2021 - 2:58pm by Lindsay Barnett

Yale University Library has entered into 2 unique membership agreements with PLOS, an open access publisher of high quality journals in science and medicine. These 3-year commitments will waive article processing charges (APCs) for Yale-affiliated authors publishing in PLOS journals! This includes all existing PLOS titles: PLOS Biology, PLOS Medicine, PLOS One, PLOS Computational Biology, PLOS Pathogens, PLOS Genetics, and PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, as well as any new PLOS publications launched during the contract term.   Last year Yale authors published more than 100 articles in PLOS journals, with APCs of up to $3,000 per article. Effective Jan. 1, 2021, these author-paid APCs will be eliminated and replaced with annual fees paid by the library. The authors will maintain copyright ownership of their research.  Read more Questions? Contact Lindsay Barnett: lindsay.barnett@yale.edu

STAT Plus is here!

January 29, 2019 - 8:53am by Lindsay Barnett

The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library, in partnership with the Lillian Goldman Law Library, has established a new subscription to STAT Plus!  What is STAT Plus? STAT Plus is STAT’s premium subscription service, which provides you with access to exclusive, in-depth pharma, biotech, life sciences, and policy coverage, keeping you on top of what's happening - as it happens. What does STAT Plus offer? On-the-spot analysis of market-moving news. A first look at early-stage research across the country. Inside intelligence from Capitol Hill. Regular intelligence briefings with our veteran beat reporters and industry experts on key trends and developments. Exclusive networking events, panel discussions, and industry events. Subscriber-only newsletters to get you briefed on important industry news. Complete access to STAT's substantial archives. Access to "cheat sheets," a way to get up to speed quickly on science, biopharma, and health policy issues. Exclusive interviews with CEOs and other industry leaders. How to sign up Anyone with a yale.edu or ynhh.edu email address can get access to STAT Plus.  Visit https://www.statnews.com/subscribe/ and enter your email address and a password of your choosing.  Your account will grant you access both on- and off-campus.  Please reach out to Lindsay Barnett with any questions or feedback.    

Free 30 Day Trial to BMJ Best Practice!

January 2, 2019 - 1:25pm by Lindsay Barnett

The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library is now hosting a free 30 day trial to BMJ Best Practice!   BMJ Best Practice is an evidence-based point of care resource that supports clinical decision making. This tool is uniquely structured around the patient consultation and provides users with step-by-step guidance on prevention, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. The database includes information on thousands of diagnoses and diagnostic tests and over 6,700 diagnostic and treatment guidelines, in addition to downloadable patient leaflets, drug databases and medical calculators. Access the resource here: http://us.bestpractice.bmj.com/best-practice/welcome.html You must be on-campus or logged into VPN to access the trial. BMJ Best Practice will be available through January 31st.  Your input is invaluable to us - please send any feedback on this resource to Lindsay Barnett (lindsay.barnett@yale.edu)!

30 Day Trial to STAT Plus!

September 24, 2018 - 9:16am by Lindsay Barnett

The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library is hosting a free 30 day trial to STAT Plus and would love your input!  To access this resource, visit the STAT Plus login page and sign up with your yale.edu or ynhh.org email address and a password of your choosing.  Your account will automatically be linked to the institutional trial.   What is STAT Plus? STAT Plus provides you with access to exclusive, in-depth pharma, biotech, life sciences, and policy coverage, keeping you on top of what's happening - as it happens. What does STAT Plus offer? On-the-spot analysis of market-moving news. A first look at early-stage research across the country. Inside intelligence from Capitol Hill. Insights from veteran beat reporters, including national biotech columnist Adam Feuerstein, senior science writer Sharon Begley, and Pharmalot columnist Ed Silverman. Complete access to STAT's substantial archives. Access to "cheat sheets," a way to get up to speed quickly on science, biopharma, and health policy issues. Exclusive interviews with CEOs and other industry leaders. The trial runs through October 24th.   Let us know what you think!  Contact Lindsay Barnett with feedback.

Free Trial to MedOne Plastic Surgery!

July 23, 2018 - 9:23am by Lindsay Barnett

The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library is hosting a free trial to MedOne Plastic Surgery!  The trial will run through August 31, 2018.  An App is available for iOS and Android operating systems; search for MedOne App in the respective app stores. Access the trial here This trial includes comprehensive access to Thieme’s complete portfolio in aesthetic and reconstructive plastic surgery: Thieme’s entire E-Book library of 150 books including CORE TEXTS for residency programs Essentials of Plastic Surgery by J. Janis and Essentials of Aesthetic Surgery by. J. Janis Surgical procedures providing step-by-step instruction on core techniques and approaches Learn from the Master series of videos providing training on cutting-edge techniques More than 50,000 images for download and use in other applications Training Center, interactive Q&A bank for board exam prep MedOne App available for Android and iOS devices Let us know what you think!  Contact Lindsay Barnett with feedback.  

VisualDx access at CWML!

May 11, 2018 - 12:33pm by Lindsay Barnett

VisualDx is now available through the library!  Thanks to all of you who reached out to share your feedback about the cancellation of this resource a year ago.  After months of conversation with VisualDx, we were able to negotiate terms more amenable to the library's budget and expectations.   We have restored access to VisualDx, and you can begin using the resource immediately.  Please let Lindsay Barnett or your departmental liaison know if you have any questions!

Free 30-Day Trial to Aquifer Addiction

April 4, 2018 - 9:08am by Lindsay Barnett

The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library is hosting a free 30 day trial to Aquifer Addiction (formerly CARE), and we would love your input!  If you are interested in exploring this product, please contact Lindsay Barnett who will create a trial account for you.  Please note that the trial is not available to students.  About Aquifer Addiction: Used in medical schools around the world, the Aquifer Addiction (CARE) online curriculum prepares medical students to identify, intervene and address substance use disorders.  The lack of formal education surrounding substance use disorders and addiction has left many practicing physicians and healthcare professionals inadequately prepared to assess, intervene, manage, and treat patients. Key Features: Twelve modules incorporate case studies, which provide an interactive platform for clinical consideration, and videos featuring today's leading experts in addiction covering key topics. Created for educators, by educators, in conjunction with the American Society of Addiction Medicine and the Treatment Research Institute. Proven pedagogy that standardizes experiences - overcoming geography, seasonality, and accessibility. Evidence-based, peer-reviewed, and continuously updated content. Self-assessment questions at the end of the course emphasize key content and enable students to test their knowledge and skills. A wealth of source material, tools, and full references in each case. Delivered via the Aqueduct learning management system, which includes user management options, easy reporting on student progress and course usage, plus tools for creating custom courses to match a specific curriculum. Available for individual or institutional subscribers for students or as continuing education.  The trial runs through May 2nd.  Let us know what you think!  Contact Lindsay Barnett with feedback.

Census Panel Discussion: Recap and Additional Resources

March 20, 2018 - 1:14pm by Lindsay Barnett

Update: On Monday, March 26th, the Commerce Department announced that the 2020 Census will reinstate the citizenship question for the first time in 70 years.  Our panelists discussed some of the dire and far-reaching consequences a Census undercount can have on public and economic health, as well as political representation.  A number of states are planning legal action in response to this decision.  See "What Can We Do?" below for a list of organizations advocating for a fair and trustworthy Census.   Thanks to all who joined us on Tuesday, February 27th for a fascinating discussion: What happens to community health when data is compromised? A discussion panel on the 2020 Census and other survey data. A special thanks to our phenomenal panelists who made this session possible:   Mark Abraham – Executive Director of DataHaven Read Mark’s coauthored article with Aparna Nathan that appeared in the Hartford Courant, “Census Underfunding Could Hurt Connecticut.” Rachel Leventhal-Weiner – Data Engagement Specialist at Connecticut Data Collaborative Contact Rachel at rlw@ctdata.org. Kenya Flash – Pol. Sci., Global Affairs & Gov. Info. Librarian at the Center for Science and Social Science Information, Yale University Miriam Olivares – GIS Librarian at the Center for Science and Social Science Information, Yale University Jim Hadler – Senior Consultant, Infectious Disease and Medical Epidemiology, Connecticut and Yale Emerging Infections Program, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists  And our Moderator, Kyle Peyton, PhD candidate in Political Science, Yale University, ISPS Policy Fellow.   For those of you who could not attend, or want to stay involved in the discussion, here are some highlights and additional resources.   What does Census data do?: Informs other population surveys Acts as an integral part of geospatial work Helps determine public health funding based on incidence Allows for analysis of social determinants of health through the American Community Survey, which fills in important details of population data that the decennial Census outlines.    Read more about the links between Census data and public health in these articles: Using the Census to understand the link between flu and poverty in New Haven, CT Exploring the relationship between poverty and premature mortality in New York City   Why is the Census endangered? A question about citizenship status has been proposed for the 2020 Census.  This question has the potential to significantly reduce response rates among already undercounted immigrant and minority communities, jeopardizing the accuracy of the data collected and driving up costs as more resources are used to follow-up with non-responders.  As Census data drives redistricting and federal funding, an inaccurate count puts vulnerable communities at risk of not receiving necessary funding and resources.  Inaccurate Census data also hinders efforts of public health officers to initiate effective disease prevention programs in high risk communities. In addition, underfunding of the Census has the potential to result in an inaccurate count, as fewer resources are available for field testing and follow-up of non-responders, among other issues.  The impacts of an undercount would be felt long after 2020, at both the local and national level.  Lack of funding doesn’t just affect the decennial Census, many Census programs and other federal surveys are at risk.  As Census data provides the infrastructure for numerous policy, commerce, and research efforts, stripping resources from the Census is like tearing up our roads and highways!    What can we do? Reach out to your congressional representative and demand a fair and thorough count!  A full count is in their self-interest as well as the communities they represent.  Follow The Census Project, a network of organizations that “support a fair and accurate 2020 Census and a comprehensive American Community Survey”. https://thecensusproject.org/ The National Democratic Redistricting Committee (NDRC) is building a strategy to end gerrymandering and create fairer maps in the 2021 redistricting process. https://democraticredistricting.com/ The Count on Stats initiative of the American Statistical Association aims to educate and advocate for the importance of trustworthy federal statistics.  https://www.amstat.org/policy-and-advocacy/count-on-stats The Council of Professional Associations on Federal Statistics devoted to increasing the public’s knowledge of Federal statistics and creating dialog around the value of Federal statistics for the public good. https://www.copafs.org/ At the local level, The Connecticut Data Collaborative aims to “empower an ecosystem of data users by democratizing access to public data and building data literacy”.  In addition to offering processed and machine-readable datasets through their data portal, the CT Data Collaborative offers a monthly open data conference call and provides updates in federal and state data in the news, in addition to various events. https://ctdata.org/ Register for the next Open Data Call and learn more about The CT Data Collaborative’s events here: https://ctdata.org/academy/ Contact a librarian at CWML for questions and additional resources about the Census and its impact on public health!  
Subscribe to RSS - Lindsay Barnett's blog