Lindsay Barnett's blog

Endangered Data Week at CWML - Schedule of Events!

20 February 2018 - 9:21am by Lindsay Barnett

Join us the week of February 26 - March 2 as we discuss datasets in danger of being lost or repressed and explore preservation strategies!  

 

Creating Surveys with Qualtrics

Tuesday, 2/20, 10-11am

Qualtrics is an easy to use but sophisticated online survey tool that is now available to students, staff and faculty at Yale. In this workshop, Clinical Librarian Melissa Funaro will introduce you to some of the features of the software and enable you to begin designing your own questionnaires and using the online data tools.

Register for this event here.

 

Biomedical Data Repositories Workshop

Monday, 2/26, 4-5pm

So you want to put your research data into a repository. Maybe you anticipate citations and credit from other researchers; maybe you practice open science; maybe data sharing is required by your journal or funder. In this workshop, Research and Education Librarian Kate Nyhan, Access Services/Clinical Librarian Alyssa Grimshaw, and Collection Development & Scholarly Communication Librarian Lindsay Barnett will go over some key questions to consider as you choose the right repository for your project.   

  • What are the advantages of domain-specific repositories and interdisciplinary repositories?
  •  Can you maintain some control over access and reuse of your data?
  • What features facilitate the discovery, re-use, and citation of your data?

By the end of the workshop, you’ll be able to discuss the pros and cons of data repositories including OSF, figshare, and NCBI (including PubMed Central’s new data deposit options), and you’ll know how to use re3data.org to find disciplinary repositories. 

Register for this event here.

 

What Happens to Community Health When Data is Compromised? A Discussion Panel on the 2020 Census and Other Survey Data

Tuesday, 2/27, 12-1pm, Medical Historical Library 

Public health researchers and policy-makers rely on accurate, representative policy data to make informed decisions.  This panel of researchers, experts, and activists will discuss how proposed changes in the 2020 Census could discourage participation, jeopardizing access to comprehensive population data.  The panelists will explore the potential impacts to community health when essential data is lost or compromised.  

Panelists:

  • Mark Abraham, Executive Director of DataHaven
  • Rachel Leventhal-Weiner, Data Engagement Specialist at Connecticut Data Collaborative
  • Kenya Flash, Pol. Sci., Global Affairs & Gov. Info. Librarian at the Center for Science and Social Science Information, Yale University
  • Miriam Olivares, GIS Librarian at the Center for Science and Social Science Information, Yale University
  • Jim Hadler, Senior Consultant, Infectious Disease and Medical Epidemiology, Connecticut and Yale Emerging Infections Program, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists

Moderated by Kyle Peyton, PhD Candidate in Political Science, ISPS Policy Fellow

This event is co-sponsored by The Institution for Social and Policy Studies (ISPS) at Yale University.  

 

Working with Census Data

Thursday, 3/1, 4-5pm

The Census Bureau offers rich, longitudinal, geocoded data on health and its social determinants.  This workshop will navigate Census.gov to find public-use data releases, technical documentation, and questionnaires for any Census Bureau survey.  Join Research and Education Librarian Kate Nyhan and Access Services/Clinical Librarian Alyssa Grimshaw to discuss key concepts for working with census data, including census geographies and the sampling implications of ACS 1-, 3-, and 5-year estimates.  You’ll try out American Fact Finder to work with tables and maps, and compare it to licensed mapping tools like SimplyMap, PolicyMap, or SocialExplorer.  When you leave the workshop, you’ll be able to leverage this rich public-use data, and you can make an informed decision about which mapping platform is right for you.

Register for this event here.

 

Can't get enough endangered data?  Check out these events hosted by ISPS!

 

Why Reproducibility in (Social) Science Matters (and How to Get it Right)

Thursday, 3/1, 10:30am-12pm

ISPS Policy Lab, 77 Prospect St.

Talk by Brian Earp (Yale University). This talk will give an overview of the relevant history and philosophy of science with respect to reproducibility, mostly using examples from psychology, and explaining why reproducibility is so important. 

Yale co-sponsors: ISPS, Yale Day of Data, Center for Science and Social Science Information, Graduate Writing Lab

Audience: Yale community

 

Making Research Transparent and Reproducible 

Friday, 3/2, 10:30am-12pm

ISPS Policy Lab, 77 Prospect St.

Workshop with Florio Arguillas (Cornell University). The hands-on workshop is intended primarily for postdocs and graduate and undergraduate students in the social sciences. The workshop will focus on practices that help researchers conduct research efficiently and transparently, including how to create replication documentation for research involving statistical data that can help keep everything organized, enhance researchers’ ability to reconstruct the data processing and analysis they do, and be easily shared with others.

Yale co-sponsors: ISPS, Stat Lab, Center for Science and Social Science Information, Yale Center for Research Computing

Audience: Yale postdocs, graduate students, and undergraduate students in social sciences.

 

 

 

 

 

Mark your calendars! Census Data and Public Health Panel Discussion (2/27, 12pm) at CWML!

14 February 2018 - 4:39pm by Lindsay Barnett

Please join us for an engaging and informative discussion with a group of expert panelists from Yale and the wider community as we consider how population data influences public health! 

 The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library and the Institution for Social and Policy Studies are hosting:

 

What happens to community health when data is compromised? A discussion panel on the 2020 Census and other survey data

February 27th, noon

Medical Historical Library, Yale School of Medicine, 333 Cedar St.

 

Public health researchers and policymakers rely on accurate, representative population data to make informed decisions.  This panel of researchers, experts, and activists will discuss how proposed changes in the 2020 Census could discourage participation, jeopardizing access to comprehensive population data.  The panelists will explore the potential impacts to community health when essential data is lost or compromised. 

 

Moderator:

Kyle Peyton – PhD candidate in Political Science, Yale University; ISPS Policy Fellow

Panelists:

Mark Abraham – Executive Director of DataHaven

Rachel Leventhal-Weiner – Data Engagement Specialist at Connecticut Data Collaborative

Kenya Flash – Pol. Sci., Global Affairs & Gov. Info. Librarian at the Center for Science and Social Science Information, Yale University

Miriam Olivares – GIS Librarian at the Center for Science and Social Science Information, Yale University

Jim Hadler – Senior Consultant, Infectious Disease and Medical Epidemiology, Connecticut and Yale Emerging Infections Program, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists 

 

This session is part of our Endangered Data Week series.

For questions, please contact Lexi Brackett (alexandria.brackett@yale.edu).

We look forward to seeing you there!

 

Love Data Week at CWML - Schedule of Events!

8 February 2018 - 10:52am by Lindsay Barnett

 

Join us the week of February 12-16th as we celebrate data!  

 

Love Data Week Kick-Off

Monday, 2/12, 11am-1pm

Join us at the front entrance of the medical library for Valentines, candy, and data!

 

Intro to Genome Browsers

Monday, 2/12 2:30-4pm

Ensembl provides access to genomic information with a number of visualization tools.  This session will review the basic functionalities and navigation of Ensembl by using specific examples.  Join Biomedical Sciences Research Support Librarian Rolando Garcia-Milian to explore the data retrieving and visualization capabilities of this resource.  Please bring your laptop to follow the instructor.

Register for Intro to Genome Browsers.

 

Data Discussion: The Cushing Center and the Cushing Tumor Registry

Thursday, 2/15, 11am-12pm

You may have seen the Cushing Center, with brains, photographs and more - but have you heard the story of how the collection came to be, and how researchers are still using these samples today?  Join Cushing Center Coordinator Terry Dagradi and Research and Education Librarian Kate Nyhan to discuss the continuing life of this extraordinary collection.
The Cushing Center will be closed for construction on 2/15, so we will meet in the medical library alcove. You're welcome to drop by at any time in the eleven o'clock hour!

 

Practical Data Research Management Workshop

Thursday, 2/15, 4-5pm

Planning how you'll manage your research data will save you time and trouble.  This workshop will discuss moments of "data management risk" and practical approaches to data management that you can apply in your own work.  Join Research and Education Librarian Kate Nyhan and Access Services/Clinical Librarian Ayssa Grimshaw and leave this workshop with a checklist of practical next steps in data management.  

Register for the Practical Research Data Management Workshop.

 

Why do we love data? Learn more about Love Data Week here!

Love Data Week and Endangered Data Week at CWML!

1 February 2018 - 4:39pm by Lindsay Barnett

Join the Cushing/Whitney Medical Library as we celebrate Love Data Week (February 12 - 16) and Endangered Data Week (February 26 - March 2)!

What are these weeks?

Date Weeks provide opportunities for researchers, scholars, data professionals, and the broader community to share stories about the data that shape our lives.  Love Data Week is devoted to data lifecycle management, including sharing, preservation, reuse, and research data services.  Endangered Data Week aims to bring light to data sets that are in danger of being deleted, repressed, mishandled, or lost.

Why are they important?

Data Weeks encourage us to stop and think about the data that we use, manage, and create both professionally and in the course of our everyday lives.  As the foundation of our research, scholarship and practice, we encourage you to consider: Are you giving your data the care it deserves?

Why celebrate with us?

Because we love data too!  We want to hear your stories and learn more about how you engage with data.  We want you to have the knowledge and tools to better manage and maintain your data.

What's happening?

CWML is planning a number of events for both weeks.  These include workshops, informational sessions, tours, and speakers. 

View our calendar of events for Love Data Week here!  

Stop by our table at the front entrance of the library February 12th from 11am-1pm, as we kick-off Love Data Week with information, crafts, and candy!

If you would like to receive messages about Data Weeks events, please send your email address to lindsay.barnett@yale.edu.

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