Blogs

High-Performance Workstation at the Cushing/Whitney Medical Library

9 March 2018 - 4:06pm by Melissa Funaro

The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library offers a high-performance workstation with a suite of licensed and open source tools, such as BRB-Array Tools, Cytoscape, and Qlucore, to process, manage, analyze, and visualize data in a variety of formats. Available to anyone with a Yale netID, this workstation can be used for high-throughput data analysis, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS) data analysis and any other type of data that requires powerful computing capabilities.

The computer is located behind the library's Information Desk.

If you would like access to this computer, please contact Rolando Garcia Milian at rolando.milian@yale.edu.

Rolando working with researcher on the high performance computer

Job Posting: Data Librarian for the Health Sciences

7 March 2018 - 8:52am by Andy Hickner

(by Judy Spak)

We are excited to announce a newly created opportunity at the Cushing/Whitney Medical Library. Come be a part of our team, or share with your friends!

Data Librarian for the Health Sciences, Medical Library (requisition #48291BR)
In an ever-changing, data-intensive environment, the Data Librarian is an enthusiastic, user-centered individual who will be responsible for the design of the library’s data support program, working collaboratively with others at Yale involved in data education and policy. This position reports to the Assistant Director of Research and Education Services and is a member of the Research and Education Team. 

Through consultation and collaboration, the Data Librarian works to enable faculty, students, clinicians, and researchers to leverage data resources to the fullest, providing information on acquisition and management of datasets for biomedical, clinical, and health sciences research. This position Increases the visibility and usability of data resources through research consultations, workshops and course-integrated instruction, online research guides, and outreach efforts. 

For your convenience, the complete posting and a link to apply can be viewed here:  http://bit.ly/2oEr7Uo.

Endangered Data Week at CWML - Schedule of Events!

20 February 2018 - 9:21am by Lindsay Barnett

Join us the week of February 26 - March 2 as we discuss datasets in danger of being lost or repressed and explore preservation strategies!  

 

Biomedical Data Repositories Workshop

Monday, 2/26, 4-5pm

So you want to put your research data into a repository. Maybe you anticipate citations and credit from other researchers; maybe you practice open science; maybe data sharing is required by your journal or funder. In this workshop, Research and Education Librarian Kate Nyhan, Access Services/Clinical Librarian Alyssa Grimshaw, and Collection Development & Scholarly Communication Librarian Lindsay Barnett will go over some key questions to consider as you choose the right repository for your project.   

  • What are the advantages of domain-specific repositories and interdisciplinary repositories?
  •  Can you maintain some control over access and reuse of your data?
  • What features facilitate the discovery, re-use, and citation of your data?

By the end of the workshop, you’ll be able to discuss the pros and cons of data repositories including OSF, figshare, and NCBI (including PubMed Central’s new data deposit options), and you’ll know how to use re3data.org to find disciplinary repositories. 

Register for this event here.

 

What Happens to Community Health When Data is Compromised? A Discussion Panel on the 2020 Census and Other Survey Data

Tuesday, 2/27, 12-1pm, Medical Historical Library 

Public health researchers and policy-makers rely on accurate, representative policy data to make informed decisions.  This panel of researchers, experts, and activists will discuss how proposed changes in the 2020 Census could discourage participation, jeopardizing access to comprehensive population data.  The panelists will explore the potential impacts to community health when essential data is lost or compromised.  

Panelists:

  • Mark Abraham, Executive Director of DataHaven
  • Rachel Leventhal-Weiner, Data Engagement Specialist at Connecticut Data Collaborative
  • Kenya Flash, Pol. Sci., Global Affairs & Gov. Info. Librarian at the Center for Science and Social Science Information, Yale University
  • Miriam Olivares, GIS Librarian at the Center for Science and Social Science Information, Yale University
  • Jim Hadler, Senior Consultant, Infectious Disease and Medical Epidemiology, Connecticut and Yale Emerging Infections Program, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists

Moderated by Kyle Peyton, PhD Candidate in Political Science, ISPS Policy Fellow

This event is co-sponsored by The Institution for Social and Policy Studies (ISPS) at Yale University.  

 

Data Discussion: Touring the Cushing Center and the Cushing Tumor Registry

Thursday, 3/1, 11am-12pm

"The brains are so cool!" All our visitors say that - but have you heard the story of how this collection came to be, and how researchers are still using these samples today? For Endangered Data Week, we're offering this special tour exploring how Cushing Tumor Registry has survived a century, and still supports research today.

The Cushing Tumor Registry was endangered when researchers moved institutions, when key staffers retired or died, when funding streams dried up, and when environmental conditions threatened preservation. Could this happen to your project? Join Cushing Center Coordinator Terry Dagradi and Research and Education Librarian Kate Nyhan to discuss the continuing life of this extraordinary (and at one time, endangered) collection.

Register for this tour here.

 

Working with Census Data

Thursday, 3/1, 4-5pm

The Census Bureau offers rich, longitudinal, geocoded data on health and its social determinants.  This workshop will navigate Census.gov to find public-use data releases, technical documentation, and questionnaires for any Census Bureau survey.  Join Research and Education Librarian Kate Nyhan and Access Services/Clinical Librarian Alyssa Grimshaw to discuss key concepts for working with census data, including census geographies and the sampling implications of ACS 1-, 3-, and 5-year estimates.  You’ll try out American Fact Finder to work with tables and maps, and compare it to licensed mapping tools like SimplyMap, PolicyMap, or SocialExplorer.  When you leave the workshop, you’ll be able to leverage this rich public-use data, and you can make an informed decision about which mapping platform is right for you.

Register for this event here.

 

Can't get enough endangered data?  Check out these events hosted by ISPS...

 

Why Reproducibility in (Social) Science Matters (and How to Get it Right)

Thursday, 3/1, 10:30am-12pm

ISPS Policy Lab, 77 Prospect St.

Talk by Brian Earp (Yale University). This talk will give an overview of the relevant history and philosophy of science with respect to reproducibility, mostly using examples from psychology, and explaining why reproducibility is so important. 

Yale co-sponsors: ISPS, Yale Day of Data, Center for Science and Social Science Information, Graduate Writing Lab

Audience: Yale community

 

Making Research Transparent and Reproducible 

Bad news! This workshop has to be postponed. Email isps@yale.edu if you'd like to be notified when it's rescheduled.

Friday, 3/2, 10:30am-12pm

ISPS Policy Lab, 77 Prospect St.

Workshop with Florio Arguillas (Cornell University). The hands-on workshop is intended primarily for postdocs and graduate and undergraduate students in the social sciences. The workshop will focus on practices that help researchers conduct research efficiently and transparently, including how to create replication documentation for research involving statistical data that can help keep everything organized, enhance researchers’ ability to reconstruct the data processing and analysis they do, and be easily shared with others.

Yale co-sponsors: ISPS, StatLab, Center for Science and Social Science Information, Yale Center for Research Computing

Audience: Yale postdocs, graduate students, and undergraduate students in social sciences.

 

...And this event hosted by the Department of Linguistics and Yale University Library!

 

Linguistics Friday Lunch Talk

Friday, 3/2, 12-1:30pm

Sterling Memorial Library Lecture Hall

A panel of Linguistics faculty and graduate students will discuss a position paper on reproducible research in linguistics.  The panel will consider the role of reproducibility in increasing verification and accountability; associated implications for how linguistic data are managed, cited, and maintained for long-term access; and mechanisms for evaluating "data work" in academic hiring, tenure, and promotion processes.  

Reproducible research in linguistics: A position statement on data citation and attribution in our field  

Panelists:

Maria Piñango, Associate Professor of Linguistics, Psychology, Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program

Jim Wood, Assistant Professor of Linguistics

Rikker Dockum, Graduate Student, Linguistics

Moderated by Claire Bowern, Professor of Linguistics

Sponsors: Department of Linguistics, Yale University Library 

 

Resource Spotlight: CINAHL

19 February 2018 - 10:55am by Caitlin Meyer

 

Welcome to Resource Spotlight! The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library provides access to an incredible array of databases, e-book collections, software and more. In this series of posts, we’ll be showcasing highlights from our collection.

In this edition of Resource Spotlight, we’ll be looking at CINAHL - The Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature. CINAHL is not only the home of a lot of the nursing and allied health literature that isn’t indexed in MEDLINE (PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE), but also features books and select conference proceedings. 

The database features full-text articles from 1,300 journals in the field and citations from thousands more. The broad coverage is complemented by search tools geared specifically towards nursing and allied health inquiries. For the sake of brevity, we’ll only discuss two: Clinical Queries and Special Interest. CINAHL’s Clinical Queries tool on the advanced search page let you select what type of question you’re asking (therapy, prognosis, etiology, qualitative, etc.) and select how broad or specific answers you’d like to receive. This way, you don’t have to browse through unnecessary or off-topic results. The Special Interest lets you filter your results before you even search as well, but by topic. Some of the topics include Case Management, Evidence-Based Practice, Pain and Pain Management, and more. 

In addition to providing access to the nursing and allied health literature, CINAHL also contains content to improve patient care such as: 

  • Continuing education modules
  • Evidence-based care sheets ranging from treatment for breast cancer to “Music and Hospitalization” 
  • Educational materials for quick overviews of diseases and conditions

CINAHL is available to Yale affiliates through the VPN, YNHH affiliates through the proxy server, and everybody on the YaleSecure WiFi network.  

Start exploring CINAHL today!

For questions on how to best use CINAHL, feel free to contact the library. 

Mark your calendars! Census Data and Public Health Panel Discussion (2/27, 12pm) at CWML!

14 February 2018 - 4:39pm by Lindsay Barnett

Please join us for an engaging and informative discussion with a group of expert panelists from Yale and the wider community as we consider how population data influences public health! 

 The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library and the Institution for Social and Policy Studies are hosting:

 

What happens to community health when data is compromised? A discussion panel on the 2020 Census and other survey data

February 27th, noon

Medical Historical Library, Yale School of Medicine, 333 Cedar St.

 

Public health researchers and policymakers rely on accurate, representative population data to make informed decisions.  This panel of researchers, experts, and activists will discuss how proposed changes in the 2020 Census could discourage participation, jeopardizing access to comprehensive population data.  The panelists will explore the potential impacts to community health when essential data is lost or compromised. 

 

Moderator:

Kyle Peyton – PhD candidate in Political Science, Yale University; ISPS Policy Fellow

Panelists:

Mark Abraham – Executive Director of DataHaven

Rachel Leventhal-Weiner – Data Engagement Specialist at Connecticut Data Collaborative

Kenya Flash – Pol. Sci., Global Affairs & Gov. Info. Librarian at the Center for Science and Social Science Information, Yale University

Miriam Olivares – GIS Librarian at the Center for Science and Social Science Information, Yale University

Jim Hadler – Senior Consultant, Infectious Disease and Medical Epidemiology, Connecticut and Yale Emerging Infections Program, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists 

 

This session is part of our Endangered Data Week series.

For questions, please contact Lexi Brackett (alexandria.brackett@yale.edu).

We look forward to seeing you there!

 

Renovation Update!

9 February 2018 - 3:04pm by Kelly Perry

We are excited to announce that plans for the renovation are moving forward! The architects are preparing the final enhanced schematic design and construction drawings with an end of March timeline. As of now, construction is tentatively scheduled to begin in mid-July.

Here are some recent preliminary drawings of the proposed Team-Based Learning classroom and the relocated Information Commons. Please note: the colors are for definition of spaces, not the actual colors for the final designs.

New classroom viewed from entrance to the room  "cutaway" view of new classroom from above  New information room on lower level

 

We are delighted to share this transformation with you. Stay tuned for more details.

"A Man of Commanding Presence": Dr. James Henry Etheridge Papers and Exhibition

8 February 2018 - 3:26pm by Andy Hickner

Dr. James Henry Etheridge as a young man, seated(by Deborah Streahle, doctoral student in the Program in the History of Medicine and Science)

The Medical Historical Library is pleased to announce a gift of the papers of 19th century physician, obstetrician, and gynecologist Dr. James Henry Etheridge.  The papers are a donation from the estate of Margaret Grant Young, 2017.

Dr. Etheridge (1844-1899) was a distinguished Chicago physician in the late 19th-century. He graduated from Rush Medical College in 1869 and, after a brief sojourn in Europe, taught there for the rest of his life. As a professor of Materia Medica, Medical Jurisprudence, and Gynecology, Dr. Etheridge was passionate about medical education and highly regarded by his peers and students. Reflecting his dedication as an alumnus, his papers feature commencement programs, newsletters, and newspaper clippings related to Rush Medical College.

In addition to teaching, Dr. Etheridge practiced as a general physician and later specialized in gynecology. He advocated for this model of medical education for his students, arguing that a specialist must work from a solid foundation in general practice lest he become “a lamentably narrow physician.”[1] Dr. Etheridge’s papers reflect his expertise with reprints of his many lectures and journal articles on gynecology, as well as casebooks and ledgers recording his patient interactions in private practice.

Beyond his local responsibilities, Etheridge also traveled to attend the meetings of several professional organizations, among them the American Medical Association and the International Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Included in his papers are conference ephemera like invitations, welcome booklets, banquet menus, and travel guides.

After his sudden death from “aneurism of the heart” in 1899, his personal physician remarked, “He was a man of commanding presence and polish and popular with all whom he came in contact.” Upon hearing the news, his students at Rush adopted a set of formal resolutions in his honor. The resolutions officially memorialized his death and reflected his esteemed place at the college.

Dr. Etheridge was survived by his wife, Harriet Elizabeth Powers, and their two daughters. Five letter files contain his and his family’s extensive personal and professional correspondence from the 1850s-1920s, as well as a beautiful baby book. As a whole, the acquisition offers insight into the life and afterlife of a scholarly physician practicing in the late-19th century.

Please view a small exhibition featuring Etheridge’s papers in the Medical Historical Library, curated by Deborah Streahle, doctoral student in the Program in the History of Medicine and Science.



[1] J.H. Etheridge, “The Gynecologist as Specialist,” Chicago Medical Recorder, 1898.

 

Love Data Week at CWML - Schedule of Events!

8 February 2018 - 10:52am by Lindsay Barnett

 

Join us the week of February 12-16th as we celebrate data!  

 

Love Data Week Kick-Off

Monday, 2/12, 11am-1pm

Join us at the front entrance of the medical library for Valentines, candy, and data!

 

Intro to Genome Browsers

Monday, 2/12 2:30-4pm

Ensembl provides access to genomic information with a number of visualization tools.  This session will review the basic functionalities and navigation of Ensembl by using specific examples.  Join Biomedical Sciences Research Support Librarian Rolando Garcia-Milian to explore the data retrieving and visualization capabilities of this resource.  Please bring your laptop to follow the instructor.

Register for Intro to Genome Browsers.

 

Data Discussion: The Cushing Center and the Cushing Tumor Registry

Thursday, 2/15, 11am-12pm

You may have seen the Cushing Center, with brains, photographs and more - but have you heard the story of how the collection came to be, and how researchers are still using these samples today?  Join Cushing Center Coordinator Terry Dagradi and Research and Education Librarian Kate Nyhan to discuss the continuing life of this extraordinary collection.
The Cushing Center will be closed for construction on 2/15, so we will meet in the medical library alcove. You're welcome to drop by at any time in the eleven o'clock hour!

 

Practical Data Research Management Workshop

Thursday, 2/15, 4-5pm

Planning how you'll manage your research data will save you time and trouble.  This workshop will discuss moments of "data management risk" and practical approaches to data management that you can apply in your own work.  Join Research and Education Librarian Kate Nyhan and Access Services/Clinical Librarian Ayssa Grimshaw and leave this workshop with a checklist of practical next steps in data management.  

Register for the Practical Research Data Management Workshop.

 

Why do we love data? Learn more about Love Data Week here!

Color Our Collections Week - 2018!

7 February 2018 - 10:50am by Kelly Perry

It's that time of year again...  Color Our Collections Week is back!

Following the lead of the New York Academy of Medicine (please visit their website, which includes not only the CWML, but several other examples of coloring pages by numerous other libraries, museums, and universities), we have rendered some of our digital images into coloring pages.

 

To see our examples from this year and last, please click on the following links:

The 2018 Cushing/Whitney Medical Library Coloring Book.
The 2017 Cushing/Whitney Medical Library Coloring Book.
The 2016 Cushing/Whitney Medical Library Coloring Book.

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